Student-Athletes' Perceptions of an Extrinsic Reward Program: A Mixed-Methods Exploration of Self-Determination Theory in the Context of College Football

Tucker Readdy, Johannes Raabe, James Scott Harding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-determination theory provides a complex yet practical understanding of motivation in sport. This study used a mixed-methods design to evaluate effects of an off-season extrinsic reward system on basic psychological need fulfillment and motivation of collegiate football players. Quantitative analyses indicated no statistically significant change in psychological need fulfillment, statistically significant decreases in amotivation and extrinsic regulation, and statistically significant increases in intrinsic motivation. Emergent qualitative themes included (a) rewarded behaviors were not meaningfully connected to successful performance; (b) extrinsic rewards were enjoyable, but not motivating; and (c) program effectiveness was heavily influenced by individual differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-171
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Applied Sport Psychology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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