Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains

Matthew J. Degges, Peter Taraschi, Jamison Syphers, Derrick Armold, J. Eric Boyer, Kenneth K. Kuo

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study reports on a class project designed to introduce students to applications of additive manufacturing in the rocket propulsion industry. Students from the Mechanical Engineering department at Alfred University (AU) have designed, built, and tested small-scale hybrid rocket motors. The project focused on design and fabrication of a test rig that could test many different grain geometries. The students used CAD and CAM software to design this hardware, and had the opportunity to work with a CNC mill and lathe to machine their designs. The primary additive manufacturing technology investigated in this project was 3D printing and was used to make unique hybrid grain designs. The novel ABS hybrid grains were made with additive manufacturing technology from two very different machines, one much more advanced than the other. Through small-scale propulsion testing at AU, we developed a reliable test to compare grains made with the inexpensive printer. To validate our testing and introduce students to a more advanced propulsion test lab, we tested several 3D printed grains at The Pennsylvania State University's High Pressure Combustion Lab (HPCL). This project was coupled to a senior-level fluid mechanics course taught at AU, and students were introduced to nozzle sizing and simple hybrid rocket motor ballistic predictions and analysis. Difficulties in accurately predicting the performance of complex grain geometry was introduced as well by comparing to data from the various tests. The ultimate goal of this student-led research is to report on the future impact additive manufacturing technology could have on hybrid rocket performance, with suggestions for grain designs.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publication49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference
    StatePublished - 2013
    Event49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference - San Jose, CA, United States
    Duration: Jul 14 2013Jul 17 2013

    Other

    Other49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Jose, CA
    Period7/14/137/17/13

    Fingerprint

    Rocket engines
    Rapid prototyping
    3D printers
    Students
    Propulsion
    Rockets
    Machine design
    Geometry
    Fluid mechanics
    Testing
    Computer aided manufacturing
    Mechanical engineering
    Ballistics
    Computer hardware
    Printing
    Nozzles
    Computer aided design
    Fabrication
    Industry

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Aerospace Engineering
    • Control and Systems Engineering
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    Cite this

    Degges, M. J., Taraschi, P., Syphers, J., Armold, D., Boyer, J. E., & Kuo, K. K. (2013). Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains. In 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference
    Degges, Matthew J. ; Taraschi, Peter ; Syphers, Jamison ; Armold, Derrick ; Boyer, J. Eric ; Kuo, Kenneth K. / Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains. 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference. 2013.
    @inproceedings{51bf3668ca3a4ecc92d8b47b17f8e9f7,
    title = "Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains",
    abstract = "This study reports on a class project designed to introduce students to applications of additive manufacturing in the rocket propulsion industry. Students from the Mechanical Engineering department at Alfred University (AU) have designed, built, and tested small-scale hybrid rocket motors. The project focused on design and fabrication of a test rig that could test many different grain geometries. The students used CAD and CAM software to design this hardware, and had the opportunity to work with a CNC mill and lathe to machine their designs. The primary additive manufacturing technology investigated in this project was 3D printing and was used to make unique hybrid grain designs. The novel ABS hybrid grains were made with additive manufacturing technology from two very different machines, one much more advanced than the other. Through small-scale propulsion testing at AU, we developed a reliable test to compare grains made with the inexpensive printer. To validate our testing and introduce students to a more advanced propulsion test lab, we tested several 3D printed grains at The Pennsylvania State University's High Pressure Combustion Lab (HPCL). This project was coupled to a senior-level fluid mechanics course taught at AU, and students were introduced to nozzle sizing and simple hybrid rocket motor ballistic predictions and analysis. Difficulties in accurately predicting the performance of complex grain geometry was introduced as well by comparing to data from the various tests. The ultimate goal of this student-led research is to report on the future impact additive manufacturing technology could have on hybrid rocket performance, with suggestions for grain designs.",
    author = "Degges, {Matthew J.} and Peter Taraschi and Jamison Syphers and Derrick Armold and Boyer, {J. Eric} and Kuo, {Kenneth K.}",
    year = "2013",
    language = "English (US)",
    isbn = "9781624102226",
    booktitle = "49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference",

    }

    Degges, MJ, Taraschi, P, Syphers, J, Armold, D, Boyer, JE & Kuo, KK 2013, Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains. in 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference. 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference, San Jose, CA, United States, 7/14/13.

    Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains. / Degges, Matthew J.; Taraschi, Peter; Syphers, Jamison; Armold, Derrick; Boyer, J. Eric; Kuo, Kenneth K.

    49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference. 2013.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains

    AU - Degges, Matthew J.

    AU - Taraschi, Peter

    AU - Syphers, Jamison

    AU - Armold, Derrick

    AU - Boyer, J. Eric

    AU - Kuo, Kenneth K.

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - This study reports on a class project designed to introduce students to applications of additive manufacturing in the rocket propulsion industry. Students from the Mechanical Engineering department at Alfred University (AU) have designed, built, and tested small-scale hybrid rocket motors. The project focused on design and fabrication of a test rig that could test many different grain geometries. The students used CAD and CAM software to design this hardware, and had the opportunity to work with a CNC mill and lathe to machine their designs. The primary additive manufacturing technology investigated in this project was 3D printing and was used to make unique hybrid grain designs. The novel ABS hybrid grains were made with additive manufacturing technology from two very different machines, one much more advanced than the other. Through small-scale propulsion testing at AU, we developed a reliable test to compare grains made with the inexpensive printer. To validate our testing and introduce students to a more advanced propulsion test lab, we tested several 3D printed grains at The Pennsylvania State University's High Pressure Combustion Lab (HPCL). This project was coupled to a senior-level fluid mechanics course taught at AU, and students were introduced to nozzle sizing and simple hybrid rocket motor ballistic predictions and analysis. Difficulties in accurately predicting the performance of complex grain geometry was introduced as well by comparing to data from the various tests. The ultimate goal of this student-led research is to report on the future impact additive manufacturing technology could have on hybrid rocket performance, with suggestions for grain designs.

    AB - This study reports on a class project designed to introduce students to applications of additive manufacturing in the rocket propulsion industry. Students from the Mechanical Engineering department at Alfred University (AU) have designed, built, and tested small-scale hybrid rocket motors. The project focused on design and fabrication of a test rig that could test many different grain geometries. The students used CAD and CAM software to design this hardware, and had the opportunity to work with a CNC mill and lathe to machine their designs. The primary additive manufacturing technology investigated in this project was 3D printing and was used to make unique hybrid grain designs. The novel ABS hybrid grains were made with additive manufacturing technology from two very different machines, one much more advanced than the other. Through small-scale propulsion testing at AU, we developed a reliable test to compare grains made with the inexpensive printer. To validate our testing and introduce students to a more advanced propulsion test lab, we tested several 3D printed grains at The Pennsylvania State University's High Pressure Combustion Lab (HPCL). This project was coupled to a senior-level fluid mechanics course taught at AU, and students were introduced to nozzle sizing and simple hybrid rocket motor ballistic predictions and analysis. Difficulties in accurately predicting the performance of complex grain geometry was introduced as well by comparing to data from the various tests. The ultimate goal of this student-led research is to report on the future impact additive manufacturing technology could have on hybrid rocket performance, with suggestions for grain designs.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883669579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883669579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Conference contribution

    AN - SCOPUS:84883669579

    SN - 9781624102226

    BT - 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference

    ER -

    Degges MJ, Taraschi P, Syphers J, Armold D, Boyer JE, Kuo KK. Student investigation of rapid prototyping technology for hybrid rocket motor fuel grains. In 49th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint PropulsionConference. 2013