Student Perceptions of the Classroom Environment

Actionable Feedback to Guide Core Instruction

Peter Marlow Nelson, James E. Ysseldyke, Theodore J. Christ

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact and feasibility of using student perceptions of the classroom teaching environment as an instructional feedback tool were explored. Thirty-one teachers serving 797 middle school students collected data twice across 3 weeks using the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching (REACT). Researchers randomly assigned half of the teachers to receive student feedback following the first data collection. Student responses in the classrooms of teachers who received feedback were more positive in the second round of data collection compared with the teachers who did not receive feedback. Students' initial REACT scores, gender, and self-reported trouble in class were also significant predictors of REACT scores at the second data collection. Finally, teachers reported the REACT to be feasible for use in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalAssessment for Effective Intervention
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Teaching
Students
instruction
classroom
teacher
student
Research Personnel
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

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Student Perceptions of the Classroom Environment : Actionable Feedback to Guide Core Instruction. / Nelson, Peter Marlow; Ysseldyke, James E.; Christ, Theodore J.

In: Assessment for Effective Intervention, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.12.2015, p. 16-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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