Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning: Implications for conceptual design

Gül E. Kremer, Conrad Tucker, Kathy Jackson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given the potential diversity of our engineering students in terms of their preparation to complete engineering design tasks, we sought to understand the implications of digital versus physical preferences in manipulating objects while completing computer aided design (CAD) tasks. We speculated that today's students who are more technology savvy would be better in virtual/digital environments (i.e., comprehension and virtual manipulation); on the other, we thought that although helpful virtual/digital experiences would not be as concrete as literally working with products, and thus the need for this additional level of concrete comprehension would be salient. Using a subject pool of 54 students, we have completed timed, in-class experiments to study our hypotheses. Results indicate that indeed some engineering students have strong preferences/comfort with virtually handling products, and for those students, timed design exercise where the interaction with the designed product was through only digital means, the performance was higher. On the other hand, student responses to questions relevant to physical manipulation of the product highly correlated with their perceptions relevant to manipulating products virtually; thus, we speculate that this points to the learning from "tinkering" in general, where students do not distinguish between the means - virtual or physical. Further (qualitative) research is needed to substantiate this however. The results of this study have implications for how solid modelling courses can be designed to be more inclusive in nature to account for learning preferences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education
Subtitle of host publicationDesign Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013
Pages735-739
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Event15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: Sep 5 2013Sep 6 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013

Other

Other15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period9/5/139/6/13

Fingerprint

Conceptual design
Students
Concretes
Computer aided design
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Kremer, G. E., Tucker, C., & Jackson, K. (2013). Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning: Implications for conceptual design. In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013 (pp. 735-739). (Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013).
Kremer, Gül E. ; Tucker, Conrad ; Jackson, Kathy. / Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning : Implications for conceptual design. Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013. 2013. pp. 735-739 (Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013).
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Kremer, GE, Tucker, C & Jackson, K 2013, Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning: Implications for conceptual design. in Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013. Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, pp. 735-739, 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013, Dublin, Ireland, 9/5/13.

Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning : Implications for conceptual design. / Kremer, Gül E.; Tucker, Conrad; Jackson, Kathy.

Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013. 2013. p. 735-739 (Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Kremer GE, Tucker C, Jackson K. Student preferences on tactile versus digital learning: Implications for conceptual design. In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013. 2013. p. 735-739. (Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Engineering and Product Design Education: Design Education - Growing Our Future, EPDE 2013).