Studying human and nonhuman primate evolutionary biology with powerful in vitro and in vivo functional genomics tools

Kathleen E. Grogan, George H. Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

In recent years, tools for functional genomic studies have become increasingly feasible for use by evolutionary anthropologists. In this review, we provide brief overviews of several exciting in vitro techniques that can be paired with “-omics” approaches (e.g., genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) for potentially powerful evolutionary insights. These in vitro techniques include ancestral protein resurrection, cell line experiments using primary, immortalized, and induced pluripotent stem cells, and CRISPR-Cas9 genetic manipulation. We also discuss how several of these methods can be used in vivo, for transgenic organism studies of human and nonhuman primate evolution. Throughout this review, we highlight example studies in which these approaches have already been used to inform our understanding of the evolutionary biology of modern and archaic humans and other primates while simultaneously identifying future opportunities for anthropologists to use this toolkit to help answer additional outstanding questions in evolutionary anthropology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-158
Number of pages16
JournalEvolutionary anthropology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology

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