Subjective anxiety measurements and cortisol responses in adults who stutter

G. W. Blood, Ingrid Maria Blood, S. Bennett, K. C. Simpson, E. J. Susman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Anxiety, as measured by self-report inventories and salivary cortisol levels, was examined in 11 males who stutter and 11 males who do not stutter during baseline, low stress, and high stress sessions. During the high stress session salivary cortisol was significantly greater in persons who stutter than in persons who do not stutter. No significant differences were found between the two groups on the State-Anxiety Inventory, Trait-Anxiety Inventory, or the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension. Significant differences in anxiety levels among the baseline, low stress, and high stress sessions for both groups of subjects were found for the State-Anxiety Inventory. No other significant differences or relationships were found between the two groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)760-768
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of speech and hearing research
Volume37
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Blood, G. W., Blood, I. M., Bennett, S., Simpson, K. C., & Susman, E. J. (1994). Subjective anxiety measurements and cortisol responses in adults who stutter. Journal of speech and hearing research, 37(4), 760-768.