Sulfide and carbon dioxide uptake by the hydrothermal vent clam, Calyptogena magnifica, and its chemoautotrophic symbionts

J. J. Childress, C. R. Fisher, J. A. Favuzzi, N. K. Sanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

The clams had the ability to concentrate sulfide from the medium, using the high-affinity sulfide-binding component in their serum, by about one order of magnitude, reaching internal sulfide concentrations as high as 6.6 mM. The symbionts used sulfide as a substrate for carbon fixation, and data suggest that they can use thiosulfate. The symbionts were quite sensitive to sulfide, with inhibition of carbon fixation occurring at low sulfide concentrations. Incubation media containing sulfide-binding substances, either Riftia pachyptila hemoglobins or C. magnifica serum sulfide-binding component, protected the symbionts from this inhibition and stimulated carbon fixation. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1444-1470
Number of pages27
JournalPhysiological Zoology
Volume64
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology (medical)

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