Summer season land cover - Convective cloud associations for the Midwest U.S. "corn belt"

Andrew Mark Carleton, Jimmy Adegoke, Jason Allard, David L. Arnold, David J. Travis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human-induced land cover modifications impact the planetary boundary layer's (PBL) thermal and moisture regimes on mesoscales. We investigate the association of croplands, forest, and the crop-forest "boundary" (CFB) with convective-cloud development (timing, amount) for three target areas (TAs) in the U.S. Midwest Corn Belt, during the summer seasons (JJA) 1991-98. For each land cover, hourly satellite-retrieved albedo and cloud-top temperature values are composited for three classes of mid-tropospheric synoptic circulation. On days with the strongest anticyclonicity, there are no consistent differences in convection related to land cover type: Cloud development is regionalized and tied primarily to synoptic conditions. However, on days having weaker anticyclonicity the CFB is the dominant site of free convection, suggesting that Non-Classical Mesoscale Circulations (NCMCs) between cropped and adjacent forest areas may operate when reduced subsidence in the mid-troposphere does not effectively cap the PBL. Index terms: Land/atmosphere interactions (3322), Mesoscale meteorology (3329), Climate dynamics (1620), Anthropogenic effects (1803).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1679-1682
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2001

Fingerprint

corn
convective cloud
summer
land cover
maize
planetary boundary layer
crops
mesoscale meteorology
boundary layer
convection
farmlands
crop
subsidence
meteorology
troposphere
albedo
caps
anthropogenic effect
free convection
moisture

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Carleton, Andrew Mark ; Adegoke, Jimmy ; Allard, Jason ; Arnold, David L. ; Travis, David J. / Summer season land cover - Convective cloud associations for the Midwest U.S. "corn belt". In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2001 ; Vol. 28, No. 9. pp. 1679-1682.
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Summer season land cover - Convective cloud associations for the Midwest U.S. "corn belt". / Carleton, Andrew Mark; Adegoke, Jimmy; Allard, Jason; Arnold, David L.; Travis, David J.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 9, 01.05.2001, p. 1679-1682.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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