Supporting the communication, language, and literacy development of children with complex communication needs: State of the science and future research priorities

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72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with complex communication needs (CCN) resulting from autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other disabilities are severely restricted in their participation in educational, vocational, family, and community environments. There is a substantial body of research that demonstrates convincingly that children with CCN derive substantial benefits from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) in their development of communication, language and literacy skills, with no risk to their speech development. Future research must address two significant challenges in order to maximize outcomes for children with CCN: (1) investigating how to improve the design of AAC apps/technologies so as to better meet the breadth of communication needs for the diverse population of children with CCN; and (2) ensuring the effective translation of these evidence-based AAC interventions to the everyday lives of children with CCN so that the possible becomes the probable. This article considers each of these challenges in turn, summarizing the state of the science as well as directions for future research and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-44
Number of pages11
JournalAssistive Technology
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Language Development
Communication
Research
Literacy
Cerebral Palsy
Down Syndrome
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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