Supportive communication from bystanders of cyberbullying: indirect effects and interactions between source and message characteristics

Andrew High, Rachel Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cyberbullying is an increasingly common experience that produces psychosocial consequences for targets. Interventions encouraging bystanders to support targets of cyberbullying are limited by a lack of focus on what to communicate. This study considers supportive messages that emphasize emotional comfort, attributions of responsibility, and beliefs that people can change as relevant to this context, and it examines how perceptions of messages differ based on whether support providers have or lack experience with cyberbullying. We extend research on the indirect effects model of supportive communication by randomly assigning participants (N= 304), who self-identify as targets of cyberbullying, to message and source conditions and assessing their perceptions of messages, providers, and outcomes. Impressions of messages mediate their influence on outcomes, and the experiential similarity of support providers moderates these effects. Certain messages, notably those contending that bullies can change, are less effective when delivered by sources who lack experience with bullying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-51
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Applied Communication Research
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

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communication
lack
Communication
interaction
experience
attribution
exclusion
responsibility
Interaction
Bystander
Supportive Communication
Bullying
Attribution
Responsibility
Emotion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

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