Surface chemical processes in chemical mechanical polishing relationship between silica material removal rate and the point of zero charge of the abrasive material

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of a silica substrate is visualized as a two-step process involving release of substrate-derived species into solution (dissolution), followed by adsorption of these species by abrasive particles. The adsorption is quantified by treating it as a surface complexation process. Mass action equations are provided for the complex-formation reaction as well as protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyls present on the abrasive particles. By combining these equations with mass balances on surface sites and dissolved species, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) goes through a maximum as the point of zero charge (pzc) of the abrasive particle increases. Further, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) is highest for the abrasive material whose pzc coincides with the pH of the polishing slurry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume149
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Chemical mechanical polishing
abrasives
polishing
Abrasives
machining
Silicon Dioxide
Silica
silicon dioxide
Substrates
Adsorption
Deprotonation
adsorption
Protonation
mass balance
Polishing
Complexation
Hydroxyl Radical

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrochemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

@article{addd49035bea4ae2a4c5ac3276e1b202,
title = "Surface chemical processes in chemical mechanical polishing relationship between silica material removal rate and the point of zero charge of the abrasive material",
abstract = "Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of a silica substrate is visualized as a two-step process involving release of substrate-derived species into solution (dissolution), followed by adsorption of these species by abrasive particles. The adsorption is quantified by treating it as a surface complexation process. Mass action equations are provided for the complex-formation reaction as well as protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyls present on the abrasive particles. By combining these equations with mass balances on surface sites and dissolved species, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) goes through a maximum as the point of zero charge (pzc) of the abrasive particle increases. Further, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) is highest for the abrasive material whose pzc coincides with the pH of the polishing slurry.",
author = "Osseo-Asare, {Kwadwo Asare}",
year = "2002",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1149/1.1516777",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "149",
journal = "Journal of the Electrochemical Society",
issn = "0013-4651",
publisher = "Electrochemical Society, Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Surface chemical processes in chemical mechanical polishing relationship between silica material removal rate and the point of zero charge of the abrasive material

AU - Osseo-Asare, Kwadwo Asare

PY - 2002/12/1

Y1 - 2002/12/1

N2 - Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of a silica substrate is visualized as a two-step process involving release of substrate-derived species into solution (dissolution), followed by adsorption of these species by abrasive particles. The adsorption is quantified by treating it as a surface complexation process. Mass action equations are provided for the complex-formation reaction as well as protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyls present on the abrasive particles. By combining these equations with mass balances on surface sites and dissolved species, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) goes through a maximum as the point of zero charge (pzc) of the abrasive particle increases. Further, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) is highest for the abrasive material whose pzc coincides with the pH of the polishing slurry.

AB - Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of a silica substrate is visualized as a two-step process involving release of substrate-derived species into solution (dissolution), followed by adsorption of these species by abrasive particles. The adsorption is quantified by treating it as a surface complexation process. Mass action equations are provided for the complex-formation reaction as well as protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyls present on the abrasive particles. By combining these equations with mass balances on surface sites and dissolved species, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) goes through a maximum as the point of zero charge (pzc) of the abrasive particle increases. Further, it is shown that the surface concentration of substrate-derived species (and, therefore, the material removal rate) is highest for the abrasive material whose pzc coincides with the pH of the polishing slurry.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036959409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036959409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1149/1.1516777

DO - 10.1149/1.1516777

M3 - Article

VL - 149

JO - Journal of the Electrochemical Society

JF - Journal of the Electrochemical Society

SN - 0013-4651

IS - 12

ER -