Surgical shunting versus transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunting for bleeding varices resulting from portal hypertension and cirrhosis: A meta-analysis

Whalen Clark, Jonathan Hernandez, Brianne McKeon, Desiree Villadolid, Sam Al-Saadi, John Mullinax, Sharona B. Ross, Alexander S. Rosemurgy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical shunting was the mainstay in treating portal hypertension for years. Recently, transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunting (TIPS) has replaced surgical shunting, first as a "bridge" to transplantation and ultimately as first-line therapy for bleeding varices. This study was undertaken to examine evidence from trials comparing TIPS with surgical shunting to reassess the role of surgery in treating portal hypertension. The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health were searched for clinical trials comparing surgical shunting with TIPS. Meta-analysis using the fixed effects model was undertaken with end points of 30-day and 1- and 2-year survival and shunt failure (inability to complete shunt, irreversible shunt occlusion, major rehemorrhage, unanticipated liver transplantation, death). Three prospective randomized trials and one retrospective case-controlled study were identified. Analysis was limited to patients of Child Classes A or B. Significantly better 2-year survival (OR 2.5 [1.2-5.2]) and significantly less frequent shunt failure (OR 0.3 [0.1-0.9]) were seen in patients undergoing surgical shunting compared with TIPS. Meta-analysis promotes surgical shunting relative to TIPS because of improved survival and less frequent shunt failure. Surgical shunting should be accepted as first-line therapy for bleeding varices resulting from portal hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-864
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume76
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Varicose Veins
Portal Hypertension
Meta-Analysis
Fibrosis
Hemorrhage
Survival
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Liver Transplantation
Transplantation
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Clark, Whalen ; Hernandez, Jonathan ; McKeon, Brianne ; Villadolid, Desiree ; Al-Saadi, Sam ; Mullinax, John ; Ross, Sharona B. ; Rosemurgy, Alexander S. / Surgical shunting versus transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunting for bleeding varices resulting from portal hypertension and cirrhosis : A meta-analysis. In: American Surgeon. 2010 ; Vol. 76, No. 8. pp. 857-864.
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Clark, W, Hernandez, J, McKeon, B, Villadolid, D, Al-Saadi, S, Mullinax, J, Ross, SB & Rosemurgy, AS 2010, 'Surgical shunting versus transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunting for bleeding varices resulting from portal hypertension and cirrhosis: A meta-analysis', American Surgeon, vol. 76, no. 8, pp. 857-864.

Surgical shunting versus transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunting for bleeding varices resulting from portal hypertension and cirrhosis : A meta-analysis. / Clark, Whalen; Hernandez, Jonathan; McKeon, Brianne; Villadolid, Desiree; Al-Saadi, Sam; Mullinax, John; Ross, Sharona B.; Rosemurgy, Alexander S.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 76, No. 8, 01.08.2010, p. 857-864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Rosemurgy, Alexander S.

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