Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures

Peter J A Kleinman, Ann M. Wolf, Andrew N. Sharpley, Douglas Brian Beegle, Lou S. Saporito

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water-extractable P (WEP) in manure is increasingly used as an environmental indicator as it is correlated with P in runoff from soils recently amended with manure. Little information exists on WEP variability across livestock manures. A survey of 140 livestock manures was conducted to assess trends in WEP (dry weight equivalent) related to livestock types and manure storage. Manure WEP ranged widely (0.2-16.8 g kg-1), with swine (Sus scrofa domestica L.) having the highest average concentrations (9.2 g kg -1), followed by turkey (Melleagris gallopavo) (6.3 g kg -1), layer chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus L.) (4.9 g kg -1), dairy cattle (Bos taurus) (4.0 g kg-1), broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus L.) (3.2 g kg-1), and beef cattle (Bos taurus) (23 g kg-1). Manure WEP also differed by general storage system; dry manures contained significantly lower WEP concentrations (3.9 g kg-1) than manure from liquid storage systems (5.4 g kg -1). Within liquid storages, no significant differences in WEP were observed between covered and uncovered storages or between bottom-loaded and top-loaded storages. Dry-matter (DM) content of manure was weakly correlated to WEP across all manures (r = -0.44), but strongly correlated with WEP in liquid swine manure (r = -0.87) and dairy manure (r = -0.72), suggesting dissolution of phosphate compounds as manure solids are diluted in storage. Varying positive correlations were observed between WEP in manure and water-extractable Ca, Mg, and Fe, or total P, depending on livestock category. Results of this study show that livestock manure can be categorized by WEP, a key step toward differential weighting of agricultural P sources in P site assessment indices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-708
Number of pages8
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume69
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

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animal manures
livestock
manure
phosphorus
water
chickens
liquids
manure storage
dairy manure
swine
environmental indicators
cattle
pig manure
liquid
environmental indicator
dry matter content
beef cattle
dairy cattle
runoff
dry matter

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Soil Science

Cite this

Kleinman, P. J. A., Wolf, A. M., Sharpley, A. N., Beegle, D. B., & Saporito, L. S. (2005). Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 69(3), 701-708. https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2004.0099
Kleinman, Peter J A ; Wolf, Ann M. ; Sharpley, Andrew N. ; Beegle, Douglas Brian ; Saporito, Lou S. / Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures. In: Soil Science Society of America Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 69, No. 3. pp. 701-708.
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Kleinman, PJA, Wolf, AM, Sharpley, AN, Beegle, DB & Saporito, LS 2005, 'Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures', Soil Science Society of America Journal, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 701-708. https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2004.0099

Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures. / Kleinman, Peter J A; Wolf, Ann M.; Sharpley, Andrew N.; Beegle, Douglas Brian; Saporito, Lou S.

In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 69, No. 3, 01.05.2005, p. 701-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Survey of water-extractable phosphorus in livestock manures

AU - Kleinman, Peter J A

AU - Wolf, Ann M.

AU - Sharpley, Andrew N.

AU - Beegle, Douglas Brian

AU - Saporito, Lou S.

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