Syllable durations of preword and early word vocalizations

Michael Robb, J. H. Saxman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The continuity in development of syllable duration patterns was examined in 7 young children as they progressed from preword to multiword periods of vocalization development. Using a combination of lexical and chronological age points, monthly vocalization samples were analyzed for bisyllable duration and final syllable lengthening. Results revealed no systematic increase or decrease in the duration of bisyllables produced by the children as a group. Lengthening of final syllables was observed across nearly all recording sessions for all children. It is likely that the feature of bisyllable duration is not discernibly sensitive to changes associated with a developing speech mechanism and environmental input. On the other hand, the regularity in final syllable lengthening is consistent with a continuity theory of development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)583-593
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of speech and hearing research
Volume33
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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continuity
theory formation
regularity
recording
Vocalization
Group
Continuity
Young children
Regularity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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Syllable durations of preword and early word vocalizations. / Robb, Michael; Saxman, J. H.

In: Journal of speech and hearing research, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 583-593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Syllable durations of preword and early word vocalizations

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