Synergic control of action in levodopa-naïve Parkinson’s disease patients: I. Multi-finger interaction and coordination

Paulo B. de Freitas, Sandra M.S.F. Freitas, Sasha Reschechtko, Tyler Corson, Mechelle M. Lewis, Xuemei Huang, Mark L. Latash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We explored the origin of the impaired control of action stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) by testing levodopa-naïve PD patients to disambiguate effects of PD from possible effects of long-term exposure to levodopa. Thirteen levodopa-naïve PD patients and 13 controls performed single- and multi-finger force production tasks, including producing a self-paced quick force pulse into a target. A subgroup of patients (n = 10) was re-tested about 1 h after the first dose of levodopa. Compared to controls, PD patients showed lower maximal forces and synergy indices stabilizing total force (reflecting the higher inter-trial variance component affecting total force). In addition, PD patients showed a trend toward shorter anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index in preparation to a quick action) and larger non-motor equivalent finger force deviations. Lower maximal force, higher unintentional force production (enslaving) and higher inter-trial variance indices occurred in PD patients after one dosage of levodopa. We conclude that impairment in synergies is present in levodopa-naïve patients, mainly in indices reflecting stability (synergy index), but not agility (anticipatory synergy adjustments). A single dose of levodopa, however, did not improve synergy indices, as it did in PD patients on chronic anti-PD medication, suggesting a different mechanism of action. The results suggest that indices of force-stabilizing synergies may be used as an early behavioral sign of PD, although it may not be sensitive to acute drug effects in drug-naïve patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-245
Number of pages17
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume238
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Fingerprint

Levodopa
Fingers
Parkinson Disease
Advisory Committees
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

@article{7dc4ea8db5fa45919a4d02f1decbb6cc,
title = "Synergic control of action in levodopa-na{\"i}ve Parkinson’s disease patients: I. Multi-finger interaction and coordination",
abstract = "We explored the origin of the impaired control of action stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) by testing levodopa-na{\"i}ve PD patients to disambiguate effects of PD from possible effects of long-term exposure to levodopa. Thirteen levodopa-na{\"i}ve PD patients and 13 controls performed single- and multi-finger force production tasks, including producing a self-paced quick force pulse into a target. A subgroup of patients (n = 10) was re-tested about 1 h after the first dose of levodopa. Compared to controls, PD patients showed lower maximal forces and synergy indices stabilizing total force (reflecting the higher inter-trial variance component affecting total force). In addition, PD patients showed a trend toward shorter anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index in preparation to a quick action) and larger non-motor equivalent finger force deviations. Lower maximal force, higher unintentional force production (enslaving) and higher inter-trial variance indices occurred in PD patients after one dosage of levodopa. We conclude that impairment in synergies is present in levodopa-na{\"i}ve patients, mainly in indices reflecting stability (synergy index), but not agility (anticipatory synergy adjustments). A single dose of levodopa, however, did not improve synergy indices, as it did in PD patients on chronic anti-PD medication, suggesting a different mechanism of action. The results suggest that indices of force-stabilizing synergies may be used as an early behavioral sign of PD, although it may not be sensitive to acute drug effects in drug-na{\"i}ve patients.",
author = "{de Freitas}, {Paulo B.} and Freitas, {Sandra M.S.F.} and Sasha Reschechtko and Tyler Corson and Lewis, {Mechelle M.} and Xuemei Huang and Latash, {Mark L.}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00221-019-05709-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "238",
pages = "229--245",
journal = "Experimental Brain Research",
issn = "0014-4819",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "1",

}

Synergic control of action in levodopa-naïve Parkinson’s disease patients : I. Multi-finger interaction and coordination. / de Freitas, Paulo B.; Freitas, Sandra M.S.F.; Reschechtko, Sasha; Corson, Tyler; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Huang, Xuemei; Latash, Mark L.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 238, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 229-245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synergic control of action in levodopa-naïve Parkinson’s disease patients

T2 - I. Multi-finger interaction and coordination

AU - de Freitas, Paulo B.

AU - Freitas, Sandra M.S.F.

AU - Reschechtko, Sasha

AU - Corson, Tyler

AU - Lewis, Mechelle M.

AU - Huang, Xuemei

AU - Latash, Mark L.

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - We explored the origin of the impaired control of action stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) by testing levodopa-naïve PD patients to disambiguate effects of PD from possible effects of long-term exposure to levodopa. Thirteen levodopa-naïve PD patients and 13 controls performed single- and multi-finger force production tasks, including producing a self-paced quick force pulse into a target. A subgroup of patients (n = 10) was re-tested about 1 h after the first dose of levodopa. Compared to controls, PD patients showed lower maximal forces and synergy indices stabilizing total force (reflecting the higher inter-trial variance component affecting total force). In addition, PD patients showed a trend toward shorter anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index in preparation to a quick action) and larger non-motor equivalent finger force deviations. Lower maximal force, higher unintentional force production (enslaving) and higher inter-trial variance indices occurred in PD patients after one dosage of levodopa. We conclude that impairment in synergies is present in levodopa-naïve patients, mainly in indices reflecting stability (synergy index), but not agility (anticipatory synergy adjustments). A single dose of levodopa, however, did not improve synergy indices, as it did in PD patients on chronic anti-PD medication, suggesting a different mechanism of action. The results suggest that indices of force-stabilizing synergies may be used as an early behavioral sign of PD, although it may not be sensitive to acute drug effects in drug-naïve patients.

AB - We explored the origin of the impaired control of action stability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) by testing levodopa-naïve PD patients to disambiguate effects of PD from possible effects of long-term exposure to levodopa. Thirteen levodopa-naïve PD patients and 13 controls performed single- and multi-finger force production tasks, including producing a self-paced quick force pulse into a target. A subgroup of patients (n = 10) was re-tested about 1 h after the first dose of levodopa. Compared to controls, PD patients showed lower maximal forces and synergy indices stabilizing total force (reflecting the higher inter-trial variance component affecting total force). In addition, PD patients showed a trend toward shorter anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index in preparation to a quick action) and larger non-motor equivalent finger force deviations. Lower maximal force, higher unintentional force production (enslaving) and higher inter-trial variance indices occurred in PD patients after one dosage of levodopa. We conclude that impairment in synergies is present in levodopa-naïve patients, mainly in indices reflecting stability (synergy index), but not agility (anticipatory synergy adjustments). A single dose of levodopa, however, did not improve synergy indices, as it did in PD patients on chronic anti-PD medication, suggesting a different mechanism of action. The results suggest that indices of force-stabilizing synergies may be used as an early behavioral sign of PD, although it may not be sensitive to acute drug effects in drug-naïve patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076272176&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85076272176&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00221-019-05709-6

DO - 10.1007/s00221-019-05709-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 31838566

AN - SCOPUS:85076272176

VL - 238

SP - 229

EP - 245

JO - Experimental Brain Research

JF - Experimental Brain Research

SN - 0014-4819

IS - 1

ER -