Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires

Achim Amma, Baharak Razavi, Sarah K. St. Angela, Theresa S. Mayer, Thomas E. Mallouk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Carbon nanotubules and nanowires were synthesized by pyrolysis of polymer precursors in the pores of alumina membranes. The nanowires were released by dissolving the membranes, and were then made hydrophilic by chemical surface derivatization. These nanowires could be placed into lithographically defined wells on surfaces by means of electrostatic interactions with monolayers at the bottoms of the wells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-370
Number of pages6
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003

Fingerprint

Chemical modification
Nanowires
nanowires
Carbon
assembly
carbon
synthesis
membranes
Membranes
Aluminum Oxide
Coulomb interactions
pyrolysis
Monolayers
nanotubes
Polymers
dissolving
Pyrolysis
Alumina
aluminum oxides
electrostatics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Amma, A., Razavi, B., St. Angela, S. K., Mayer, T. S., & Mallouk, T. E. (2003). Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires. Advanced Functional Materials, 13(5), 365-370. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.200304232
Amma, Achim ; Razavi, Baharak ; St. Angela, Sarah K. ; Mayer, Theresa S. ; Mallouk, Thomas E. / Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2003 ; Vol. 13, No. 5. pp. 365-370.
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Amma, A, Razavi, B, St. Angela, SK, Mayer, TS & Mallouk, TE 2003, 'Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires', Advanced Functional Materials, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 365-370. https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.200304232

Synthesis, chemical modification, and surface assembly of carbon nanowires. / Amma, Achim; Razavi, Baharak; St. Angela, Sarah K.; Mayer, Theresa S.; Mallouk, Thomas E.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.05.2003, p. 365-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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