Synthesis of silicon carbide thin films with polycarbosilane (PCS)

Paolo Colombo, Thomas E. Paulson, Carlo G. Pantano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polycarbosilane (PCS) thin films were deposited on silicon (and other) substrates and heat treated under vacuum (∼10 -6 torr) at temperatures in the range of 200°-1200°C. At temperatures in the range of 1000°-1200°C, the initially amorphous PCS films transformed to polycrystalline β-silicon carbide (β-SiC). Although PCS films could be deposited at thickness up to 2 μm, the films with thicknesses >1 μm could not be transformed to SiC without extensive cracking. The resulting SiC coatings were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, glancing-angle X-ray diffractometry, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, Raman spectoscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The temperature and time dependence of the amorphous-to-crystalline transition could be associated with the evolution of free carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the films.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2333-2340
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume80
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1997

Fingerprint

Silicon carbide
Thin films
Silicon
Amorphous films
Polysilicon
Temperature
X ray diffraction analysis
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
Raman spectroscopy
Hydrogen
Carbon
Vacuum
Ions
Oxygen
Crystalline materials
Transmission electron microscopy
Coatings
Scanning electron microscopy
Substrates
silicon carbide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Colombo, P., Paulson, T. E., & Pantano, C. G. (1997). Synthesis of silicon carbide thin films with polycarbosilane (PCS). Journal of the American Ceramic Society, 80(9), 2333-2340.
Colombo, Paolo ; Paulson, Thomas E. ; Pantano, Carlo G. / Synthesis of silicon carbide thin films with polycarbosilane (PCS). In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society. 1997 ; Vol. 80, No. 9. pp. 2333-2340.
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Colombo, P, Paulson, TE & Pantano, CG 1997, 'Synthesis of silicon carbide thin films with polycarbosilane (PCS)', Journal of the American Ceramic Society, vol. 80, no. 9, pp. 2333-2340.

Synthesis of silicon carbide thin films with polycarbosilane (PCS). / Colombo, Paolo; Paulson, Thomas E.; Pantano, Carlo G.

In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 80, No. 9, 01.09.1997, p. 2333-2340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Pantano, Carlo G.

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