Synthesizing IT job skills identified in academic studies, practitioner publications and job ads

Haiyan Huang, Lynette Kvasny, K. D. Joshi, Eileen Trauth, Jan Mahar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research examines IT job skills across three genres of texts: scholarly articles, practitioner literature, and online job ads. The job skills are organized in three broad categories: technical, humanistic and business skills. Findings suggest that the online advertisements list a strong mix of skills in these three categories, while practitioner literature tends to focus heavily on technical skills. The most recent practitioner literature, however, notes that CIOs are increasingly demanding business acumen as well as technical skills. Project management, financial analysis, and communication skills are the most frequently cited business skills. The scholarly literature tends to lag behind in terms of specific technical skills, but reports the richest set of IT job skills across the three categories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGMIS CPR'09 - Proceedings of the 2009 ACM SIGMIS Computer Personnel Research Conference
Pages121-127
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
EventSpecial Interest Group on Management Information System's 47th Annual Conference on Computer Personnel Research, SIGMIS-CPR '09 - Limerick, Ireland
Duration: May 28 2009May 30 2009

Publication series

NameSIGMIS CPR'09 - Proceedings of the 2009 ACM SIGMIS Computer Personnel Research Conference

Other

OtherSpecial Interest Group on Management Information System's 47th Annual Conference on Computer Personnel Research, SIGMIS-CPR '09
CountryIreland
CityLimerick
Period5/28/095/30/09

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Management Information Systems
  • Information Systems and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

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