Systematic review of endoscopic airway findings in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease

Jason Glenn May, Priyanka Shah, Lori Lemonnier, Gaurav Bhatti, Jovana Koscica, James M. Coticchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We performed a systematic review of published literature correlating findings on endoscopic evaluation of the larynx and trachea in the pediatric population with the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods: Eight articles were identified through a structured PubMed search of English-language literature using the key terms laryngopharyngeal reflux, extraesophageal reflux, and gastroesophageal reflux. A systematic review was performed relating the presence of reflux in the pediatric population to findings on endoscopic airway evaluation. A covariant analysis was performed, and each study was weighted according to the number of available samples in that study as a fraction of the total. Overall odds ratios and confidence intervals were computed for each endoscopic finding on the basis of the documented absence or presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Results: A correlation was seen between the endoscopic findings and the presence of reflux. Conclusions: Arytenoid, postglottic, and vocal fold edema and erythema, lingual tonsil hypertrophy, laryngomalacia, and subglottic stenosis are among the endoscopic findings most frequently identified in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Certain findings commonly encountered on endoscopic evaluation of the larynx and trachea in children who present with respiratory symptoms do indeed demonstrate a correlation with the presence of laryngopharyngeal reflux disease and may indicate the need for antireflux therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

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Gastroesophageal Reflux
Laryngopharyngeal Reflux
Larynx
Trachea
Laryngomalacia
Pediatrics
Vocal Cords
Palatine Tonsil
Erythema
Tongue
PubMed
Hypertrophy
Population
Edema
Pathologic Constriction
Language
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

May, Jason Glenn ; Shah, Priyanka ; Lemonnier, Lori ; Bhatti, Gaurav ; Koscica, Jovana ; Coticchia, James M. / Systematic review of endoscopic airway findings in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 2011 ; Vol. 120, No. 2. pp. 116-122.
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Systematic review of endoscopic airway findings in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. / May, Jason Glenn; Shah, Priyanka; Lemonnier, Lori; Bhatti, Gaurav; Koscica, Jovana; Coticchia, James M.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 120, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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