Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis

Hannah Atkins, Susan E. Appt, Robert N. Taylor, Yaritbel Torres-Mendoza, Emily E. Lenk, Nancy S. Rosenthal, David L. Caudell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Endometriosis is characterized by endometrial tissue development outside the uterus. Anemia and iron depletion do not commonly accompany endometriosis in women, despite chronic abdominal inflammation and heavy menstrual bleeding. The objective of this study was to examine iron kinetics associated with endometriosis by using a NHP model, to better understand the underlying mechanism of abnormal hematogram values in women with endometriosis. Hematologic data from 46 macaques with endometriosis were examined for signs of iron depletion. Bone marrow, liver, and serum were used to elucidate whether iron loss or inflammation best explained the hematologic findings. Additional serum markers and intestinal biopsies from NHP with and without endometriosis were evaluated for patterns in iron kinetics across the menstrual cycle and for relative dietary iron-absorbing capacity. Almost half of the NHP with endometriosis were anemic. Overall, NHP had decreased RBC counts, increased MCV, increased percentage of reticulocytes, decreased serum hepcidin, and decreased hepatic and bone marrow iron. Intestinal expression of ferroportin 1, a mediator of iron absorption, was increased, indicating that despite high dietary iron, intestinal iron absorption did not compensate for iron losses. We concluded that use of oral iron supplementation alone does not replenish iron stores in endometriosis. Consequently, iron stores should be evaluated in women with endometriosis, even without overt clinical signs of anemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)298-307
Number of pages10
JournalComparative Medicine
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Endometriosis
Primates
Iron
animal models
iron
Dietary Iron
iron absorption
bone marrow
Anemia
Bone
inflammation
Bone Marrow
Hepcidins
Inflammation
kinetics
reticulocytes
liver
menstrual cycle
Kinetics
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Atkins, H., Appt, S. E., Taylor, R. N., Torres-Mendoza, Y., Lenk, E. E., Rosenthal, N. S., & Caudell, D. L. (2018). Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis. Comparative Medicine, 68(4), 298-307. https://doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-000082
Atkins, Hannah ; Appt, Susan E. ; Taylor, Robert N. ; Torres-Mendoza, Yaritbel ; Lenk, Emily E. ; Rosenthal, Nancy S. ; Caudell, David L. / Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis. In: Comparative Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 68, No. 4. pp. 298-307.
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Atkins, H, Appt, SE, Taylor, RN, Torres-Mendoza, Y, Lenk, EE, Rosenthal, NS & Caudell, DL 2018, 'Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis', Comparative Medicine, vol. 68, no. 4, pp. 298-307. https://doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-000082

Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis. / Atkins, Hannah; Appt, Susan E.; Taylor, Robert N.; Torres-Mendoza, Yaritbel; Lenk, Emily E.; Rosenthal, Nancy S.; Caudell, David L.

In: Comparative Medicine, Vol. 68, No. 4, 01.08.2018, p. 298-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Atkins H, Appt SE, Taylor RN, Torres-Mendoza Y, Lenk EE, Rosenthal NS et al. Systemic iron deficiency in a nonhuman primate model of endometriosis. Comparative Medicine. 2018 Aug 1;68(4):298-307. https://doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-000082