Tactile shape discrimination recruits human lateral occipital complex during early perceptual processing

Joshua N. Lucan, John J. Foxe, Manuel Gomez-Ramirez, Krishnankutty Sathian, Sophie Molholm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuroimaging studies investigating somatosensory-based object recognition in humans have revealed activity in the lateral occipital complex, a cluster of regions primarily associated with visual object recognition. To date, determining whether this activity occurs during or subsequent to recognition per se, has been difficult to assess due to the lowtemporal resolution of the hemodynamic response. To more finelymeasure the timing of somatosensory object recognition processes we employed high density EEG using amodified version of a paradigm previously applied to neuroimaging experiments. Simple geometric shapes were presented to the right index finger of 10 participantswhile the ongoing EEGwas measured time locked to the stimulus. In the condition of primary interest participants discriminated the shape of the stimulus. In the alternate condition they judged stimulus duration. Using traditional event-related potential analysis techniques we found significantly greater amplitudes in the evoked potentials of the shape discrimination condition between 140 and 160ms, a timeframe inwhich LOCmediated perceptual processes are believed to occur during visual object recognition. Scalp voltage topography and source analysis procedures indicated the lateral occipital complex as the likely source behind this effect. This finding supports amultisensory role for the lateral occipital complex during object recognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1813-1821
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Touch
Evoked Potentials
Neuroimaging
Scalp
Fingers
Electroencephalography
Hemodynamics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Lucan, Joshua N. ; Foxe, John J. ; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel ; Sathian, Krishnankutty ; Molholm, Sophie. / Tactile shape discrimination recruits human lateral occipital complex during early perceptual processing. In: Human Brain Mapping. 2010 ; Vol. 31, No. 11. pp. 1813-1821.
@article{9617db3153994a59b4ab25d42714751f,
title = "Tactile shape discrimination recruits human lateral occipital complex during early perceptual processing",
abstract = "Neuroimaging studies investigating somatosensory-based object recognition in humans have revealed activity in the lateral occipital complex, a cluster of regions primarily associated with visual object recognition. To date, determining whether this activity occurs during or subsequent to recognition per se, has been difficult to assess due to the lowtemporal resolution of the hemodynamic response. To more finelymeasure the timing of somatosensory object recognition processes we employed high density EEG using amodified version of a paradigm previously applied to neuroimaging experiments. Simple geometric shapes were presented to the right index finger of 10 participantswhile the ongoing EEGwas measured time locked to the stimulus. In the condition of primary interest participants discriminated the shape of the stimulus. In the alternate condition they judged stimulus duration. Using traditional event-related potential analysis techniques we found significantly greater amplitudes in the evoked potentials of the shape discrimination condition between 140 and 160ms, a timeframe inwhich LOCmediated perceptual processes are believed to occur during visual object recognition. Scalp voltage topography and source analysis procedures indicated the lateral occipital complex as the likely source behind this effect. This finding supports amultisensory role for the lateral occipital complex during object recognition.",
author = "Lucan, {Joshua N.} and Foxe, {John J.} and Manuel Gomez-Ramirez and Krishnankutty Sathian and Sophie Molholm",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/hbm.20983",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "1813--1821",
journal = "Human Brain Mapping",
issn = "1065-9471",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "11",

}

Tactile shape discrimination recruits human lateral occipital complex during early perceptual processing. / Lucan, Joshua N.; Foxe, John J.; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Sathian, Krishnankutty; Molholm, Sophie.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 31, No. 11, 01.11.2010, p. 1813-1821.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tactile shape discrimination recruits human lateral occipital complex during early perceptual processing

AU - Lucan, Joshua N.

AU - Foxe, John J.

AU - Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel

AU - Sathian, Krishnankutty

AU - Molholm, Sophie

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - Neuroimaging studies investigating somatosensory-based object recognition in humans have revealed activity in the lateral occipital complex, a cluster of regions primarily associated with visual object recognition. To date, determining whether this activity occurs during or subsequent to recognition per se, has been difficult to assess due to the lowtemporal resolution of the hemodynamic response. To more finelymeasure the timing of somatosensory object recognition processes we employed high density EEG using amodified version of a paradigm previously applied to neuroimaging experiments. Simple geometric shapes were presented to the right index finger of 10 participantswhile the ongoing EEGwas measured time locked to the stimulus. In the condition of primary interest participants discriminated the shape of the stimulus. In the alternate condition they judged stimulus duration. Using traditional event-related potential analysis techniques we found significantly greater amplitudes in the evoked potentials of the shape discrimination condition between 140 and 160ms, a timeframe inwhich LOCmediated perceptual processes are believed to occur during visual object recognition. Scalp voltage topography and source analysis procedures indicated the lateral occipital complex as the likely source behind this effect. This finding supports amultisensory role for the lateral occipital complex during object recognition.

AB - Neuroimaging studies investigating somatosensory-based object recognition in humans have revealed activity in the lateral occipital complex, a cluster of regions primarily associated with visual object recognition. To date, determining whether this activity occurs during or subsequent to recognition per se, has been difficult to assess due to the lowtemporal resolution of the hemodynamic response. To more finelymeasure the timing of somatosensory object recognition processes we employed high density EEG using amodified version of a paradigm previously applied to neuroimaging experiments. Simple geometric shapes were presented to the right index finger of 10 participantswhile the ongoing EEGwas measured time locked to the stimulus. In the condition of primary interest participants discriminated the shape of the stimulus. In the alternate condition they judged stimulus duration. Using traditional event-related potential analysis techniques we found significantly greater amplitudes in the evoked potentials of the shape discrimination condition between 140 and 160ms, a timeframe inwhich LOCmediated perceptual processes are believed to occur during visual object recognition. Scalp voltage topography and source analysis procedures indicated the lateral occipital complex as the likely source behind this effect. This finding supports amultisensory role for the lateral occipital complex during object recognition.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649618155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649618155&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hbm.20983

DO - 10.1002/hbm.20983

M3 - Article

C2 - 20162607

AN - SCOPUS:78649618155

VL - 31

SP - 1813

EP - 1821

JO - Human Brain Mapping

JF - Human Brain Mapping

SN - 1065-9471

IS - 11

ER -