Target hardening the college campus through stakeholder input

Merging community and the security survey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical security surveys have for many years been an integral component of an overall crime prevention plan for post-secondary institutions. As assessment tools, they highlight vulnerable features of design and environment that could potentially put persons or property at risk. Noticeably absent from a majority of these surveys is input from the constituents (community) that regularly use these complexes as students, employees, residents, or visitors. The perceptions of these users give a differing perspective on how those who may perhaps be most familiar with the institution under scrutiny view potential risks. By merging a physical survey of facilities with stakeholder input, a more comprehensive crime control strategy can be developed and implemented that addresses the needs of both users and administrators. The present research illustrates how such a dual method was undertaken at an urban university and discusses the benefits that emerge when two perspectives are taken into account in developing an institutional security plan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-136
Number of pages19
JournalCrime Prevention and Community Safety
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

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Merging
Hardening
Crime
stakeholder
community
crime prevention
employee
offense
Personnel
resident
Students
human being
university
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Safety Research
  • Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Physical security surveys have for many years been an integral component of an overall crime prevention plan for post-secondary institutions. As assessment tools, they highlight vulnerable features of design and environment that could potentially put persons or property at risk. Noticeably absent from a majority of these surveys is input from the constituents (community) that regularly use these complexes as students, employees, residents, or visitors. The perceptions of these users give a differing perspective on how those who may perhaps be most familiar with the institution under scrutiny view potential risks. By merging a physical survey of facilities with stakeholder input, a more comprehensive crime control strategy can be developed and implemented that addresses the needs of both users and administrators. The present research illustrates how such a dual method was undertaken at an urban university and discusses the benefits that emerge when two perspectives are taken into account in developing an institutional security plan.",
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Target hardening the college campus through stakeholder input : Merging community and the security survey. / Hummer, II, Donald Charles; Preston, Pamela.

In: Crime Prevention and Community Safety, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.04.2006, p. 118-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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