Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The significant initial time commitment to create online content required for flipped classrooms may pose an obstacle to their implementation, despite the known learning benefits. We hypothesize that flipping only specific, problematic topics may still provide benefits to students with less instructor preparation. In this study, we targeted a flipped classroom toward a single, difficult course unit (the Reynolds Transport Theorem in fluid mechanics) to reduce the total time required for course preparation. Six lectures on this topic were converted to online videos and in-class time was used for group-based problem solving. Comparisons were made between a traditional lecture section (n=8) and flipped classroom sections (n = 15). A statistically significant improvement was seen when comparing exam performance on a question-by-question basis. Student survey responses about the method were unanimously positive, and students specifically noted the ability to rewatch sections of the video as a benefit to their learning. The interview responses also produced an unanticipated result. Students indicated that they preferred the partial approach to a hypothetical full course flip, stating they felt "it would get old. " While the use of a targeted flipped classroom was investigated here to reduce the initial faculty time commitment, this finding may warrant future investigation on reaction to partial versus full course flipped classrooms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016
Subtitle of host publicationThe Crossroads of Engineering and Business
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781509017904
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2016
Event46th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2016 - Erie, United States
Duration: Oct 12 2016Oct 15 2016

Publication series

NameProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
Volume2016-November
ISSN (Print)1539-4565

Other

Other46th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2016
CountryUnited States
CityErie
Period10/12/1610/15/16

Fingerprint

Students
classroom
video
student
commitment
Fluid mechanics
mechanic
learning
instructor
time
ability
interview
performance
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Ranalli, J., & Moore, J. (2016). Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic. In FIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016: The Crossroads of Engineering and Business [7757603] (Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE; Vol. 2016-November). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2016.7757603
Ranalli, Joseph ; Moore, Jacob. / Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic. FIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016: The Crossroads of Engineering and Business. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. (Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE).
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Ranalli, J & Moore, J 2016, Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic. in FIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016: The Crossroads of Engineering and Business., 7757603, Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE, vol. 2016-November, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 46th Annual Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE 2016, Erie, United States, 10/12/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2016.7757603

Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic. / Ranalli, Joseph; Moore, Jacob.

FIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016: The Crossroads of Engineering and Business. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. 7757603 (Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE; Vol. 2016-November).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Ranalli J, Moore J. Targeted flipped classroom technique applied to a challenging topic. In FIE 2016 - Frontiers in Education 2016: The Crossroads of Engineering and Business. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2016. 7757603. (Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE). https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2016.7757603