Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

Jessica K. O'Hara, Lewis J. Kerwin, Simon A. Cobbold, Jonathan Tai, Thomas A. Bedell, Paul J. Reider, Manuel Llinas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is an essential metabolite utilized as a redox cofactor and enzyme substrate in numerous cellular processes. Elevated NAD+ levels have been observed in red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known regarding how the parasite generates NAD+. Here, we employed a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to confirm that P. falciparum lacks the ability to synthesize NAD+ de novo and is reliant on the uptake of exogenous niacin. We characterized several enzymes in the NAD+ pathway and demonstrate cytoplasmic localization for all except the parasite nicotinamidase, which concentrates in the nucleus. One of these enzymes, the P. falciparum nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (PfNMNAT), is essential for NAD+ metabolism and is highly diverged from the human homolog, but genetically similar to bacterial NMNATs. Our results demonstrate the enzymatic activity of PfNMNAT in vitro and demonstrate its ability to genetically complement the closely related Escherichia coli NMNAT. Due to the similarity of PfNMNAT to the bacterial enzyme, we tested a panel of previously identified bacterial NMNAT inhibitors and synthesized and screened twenty new derivatives, which demonstrate a range of potency against live parasite culture. These results highlight the importance of the parasite NAD+ metabolic pathway and provide both novel therapeutic targets and promising lead antimalarial compounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere94061
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2014

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Falciparum Malaria
NAD (coenzyme)
Plasmodium falciparum
Metabolism
NAD
malaria
Parasites
parasites
metabolism
Nicotinamidase
Enzymes
enzymes
Lead compounds
antimalarials
Metabolomics
enzyme substrates
Niacin
Coenzymes
niacin
Antimalarials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

O'Hara, J. K., Kerwin, L. J., Cobbold, S. A., Tai, J., Bedell, T. A., Reider, P. J., & Llinas, M. (2014). Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PloS one, 9(4), [e94061]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094061
O'Hara, Jessica K. ; Kerwin, Lewis J. ; Cobbold, Simon A. ; Tai, Jonathan ; Bedell, Thomas A. ; Reider, Paul J. ; Llinas, Manuel. / Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 4.
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O'Hara, JK, Kerwin, LJ, Cobbold, SA, Tai, J, Bedell, TA, Reider, PJ & Llinas, M 2014, 'Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 4, e94061. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094061

Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. / O'Hara, Jessica K.; Kerwin, Lewis J.; Cobbold, Simon A.; Tai, Jonathan; Bedell, Thomas A.; Reider, Paul J.; Llinas, Manuel.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 4, e94061, 18.04.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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O'Hara JK, Kerwin LJ, Cobbold SA, Tai J, Bedell TA, Reider PJ et al. Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PloS one. 2014 Apr 18;9(4). e94061. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094061