Targeting single parents in preadolescent substance use prevention: Internet characteristics and information relevance

Jennifer Warren, Michele Allen, Kolawole Okuyemi, Lynette Kvasny, Michael Hecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study investigates the internet as a resource for parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention information for African-American single mothers receiving public assistance in the United States. Methods: Thirty-two mothers with at least one preadolescent child participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews and usefulness studies eliciting information about their perceptions of the internet as an information and online resource for parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention. Themes were generated qualitatively through an iterative process of comparative analysis. Findings: Findings reveal a consensus that the internet is convenient, comfortable to use and provides accessibility to broad information. However, as related to parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention, participants reviewing established prevention sites (e.g. NIDA) noted that several lacked personal relevance (e.g. did not relate to life experiences and circumstances). These personal considerations override cultural concerns, although issues of representation (i.e. information related to group membership) were still important. Conclusions: Online preadolescent substance use prevention information targeting African-American single mothers would be useful and utilized as a resource if messages make sense within the day-to-day experiences of this ethnic group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)400-412
Number of pages13
JournalDrugs: Education, Prevention and Policy
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

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Single Parent
single parent
Internet
Mothers
African Americans
Public Assistance
parents
Life Change Events
Ethnic Groups
Consensus
resources
Interviews
group membership
ethnic group
experience
assistance
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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Targeting single parents in preadolescent substance use prevention : Internet characteristics and information relevance. / Warren, Jennifer; Allen, Michele; Okuyemi, Kolawole; Kvasny, Lynette; Hecht, Michael.

In: Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.07.2010, p. 400-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kvasny, Lynette

AU - Hecht, Michael

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N2 - Aim: This study investigates the internet as a resource for parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention information for African-American single mothers receiving public assistance in the United States. Methods: Thirty-two mothers with at least one preadolescent child participated in in-depth semi-structured interviews and usefulness studies eliciting information about their perceptions of the internet as an information and online resource for parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention. Themes were generated qualitatively through an iterative process of comparative analysis. Findings: Findings reveal a consensus that the internet is convenient, comfortable to use and provides accessibility to broad information. However, as related to parent-based preadolescent substance use prevention, participants reviewing established prevention sites (e.g. NIDA) noted that several lacked personal relevance (e.g. did not relate to life experiences and circumstances). These personal considerations override cultural concerns, although issues of representation (i.e. information related to group membership) were still important. Conclusions: Online preadolescent substance use prevention information targeting African-American single mothers would be useful and utilized as a resource if messages make sense within the day-to-day experiences of this ethnic group.

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