Teaching children to confront peers' sexist remarks: Implications for theories of gender development and educational practice

Lindsay M. Lamb, Rebecca S. Bigler, Lynn Susan Liben, Vanessa A. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elementary-school children (81 boys, 72 girls, aged 5-10 years) in the Southwest United States were taught to challenge peers' sexist remarks to (a) improve school climate for gender nontraditional children, (b) decrease children's gender-typed attitudes, and (c) test hypotheses linking gender identity and peer-directed gender role behaviors. Children either practiced using retorts to peers' sexist remarks (practice condition) or heard stories about others' retorts (narrative condition). At pretest, children rarely challenged peers' sexist remarks. At posttest, children's challenges were significantly more common in the practice than narrative condition. At the 6-month posttest, data showed intervention effects had become more widespread. Behavioral changes led to decreases in gender-typing of others among girls but not boys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-382
Number of pages22
JournalSex Roles
Volume61
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2009

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educational practice
Teaching
gender
role behavior
narrative
school climate
gender role
schoolchild
elementary school
Climate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Lamb, Lindsay M. ; Bigler, Rebecca S. ; Liben, Lynn Susan ; Green, Vanessa A. / Teaching children to confront peers' sexist remarks : Implications for theories of gender development and educational practice. In: Sex Roles. 2009 ; Vol. 61, No. 5-6. pp. 361-382.
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Teaching children to confront peers' sexist remarks : Implications for theories of gender development and educational practice. / Lamb, Lindsay M.; Bigler, Rebecca S.; Liben, Lynn Susan; Green, Vanessa A.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 61, No. 5-6, 08.05.2009, p. 361-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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