Telemetry

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Telemetry is the science of gathering information at some remote location and transmitting the data to a convenient location to be examined and recorded. Telemetry can by done by different methods: optical, mechanical, hydraulic, electric, etc. The mechanical methods, either pneumatic or hydraulic have acceptable results for short distances and are used in environments that have a high level of electromagnetic interference and in those situations where, for security reasons, it is not possible to use electrical signals, for example, in explosive environments. More recently, use of optical fiber systems allows the measurement of broad bandwidth and high immunity to noise and interference. Other proposed telemetry systems are based on ultrasound, capacitive or magnetic coupling, and infrared radiation, although these methods are not routinely used. The discussion in this chapter will be limited to the most used systems: telemetry based on electric signals. The main advantage of electric over mechanical methods is that electrically based telemetry does not have practical limits regarding the distance between the measurement and the analysis areas, and can be easily adapted and upgraded in already existing infrastructures. Electric telemetry methods are further divided depending on the transmission channel that they use as wire telemetry and wireless (or radio) telemetry. Wire telemetry is technologically the simplest solution. The limitations of wire telemetry are the low bandwidth and low transmission speed that it can support. However, it is used when the transmission wires can use the already existing infrastructure, as, for example, in most electric power lines that are also used as wire telemetry carriers. Wireless telemetry is more complex than wire telemetry, as it requires a final radio frequency (RF) stage. Despite its complexity, it is widely used because it can transmit information over longer distances; thus, it is used in those applications in which the measurement area is not normally accessible. It can also transmit at higher speeds and have enough capacity to transmit several channels of information if necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationElectrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays
PublisherCRC Press
Pages27-1-27-17
ISBN (Electronic)9780203009406
ISBN (Print)9780849317330
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

telemetry
Telemetering
wire
Wire
hydraulics
radio telemetry
Hydraulics
bandwidth
power lines
Bandwidth
Magnetic couplings
electromagnetic interference
pneumatics
immunity
infrared radiation
electric power
Signal interference
Pneumatics
radio frequencies
Optical fibers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Lozano-Nieto, A. (2003). Telemetry. In Electrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays (pp. 27-1-27-17). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203009406
Lozano-Nieto, Albert. / Telemetry. Electrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays. CRC Press, 2003. pp. 27-1-27-17
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Lozano-Nieto, A 2003, Telemetry. in Electrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays. CRC Press, pp. 27-1-27-17. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203009406

Telemetry. / Lozano-Nieto, Albert.

Electrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays. CRC Press, 2003. p. 27-1-27-17.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Lozano-Nieto A. Telemetry. In Electrical Measurement, Signal Processing, and Displays. CRC Press. 2003. p. 27-1-27-17 https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203009406