Telephone Versus Print Delivery of an Individualized Motivationally Tailored Physical Activity Intervention

Project STRIDE

Bess H. Marcus, Melissa A. Napolitano, Abby C. King, Beth A. Lewis, Jessica A. Whiteley, Anna Albrecht, Alfred Parisi, Beth Bock, Bernardine Pinto, Christopher Sciamanna, John Jakicic, George D. Papandonatos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Given that only 25% of Americans meet physical activity recommendations, there is a need to develop and disseminate effective, evidence-based interventions to promote physical activity. The authors tested 2 delivery channels, telephone and print, to determine whether one was more effective in promoting physical activity. Design: The authors randomly assigned 239 healthy, sedentary adults to (a) telephone-based individualized feedback, (b) print-based individualized feedback, or (c) contact control. Both intervention arms were guided by a motivationally tailored, theoretically driven computer expert system. Main outcome measures: Physical activity as measured by the 7-day Physical Activity Recall interview. Results: At 6 months, both telephone and print arms significantly increased in minutes of moderate intensity physical activity compared with control, with no differences between the intervention arms. At 12 months, print participants reported a significantly greater number of moderate intensity minutes than both telephone and control participants, who did not differ. Conclusion: Results suggest that both telephone and print enhance the adoption of physical activity among sedentary adults; however, print interventions may be particularly effective in maintaining physical activity in the longer term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-409
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Telephone
Expert Systems
Computer Systems
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Marcus, B. H., Napolitano, M. A., King, A. C., Lewis, B. A., Whiteley, J. A., Albrecht, A., ... Papandonatos, G. D. (2007). Telephone Versus Print Delivery of an Individualized Motivationally Tailored Physical Activity Intervention: Project STRIDE. Health Psychology, 26(4), 401-409. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.26.4.401
Marcus, Bess H. ; Napolitano, Melissa A. ; King, Abby C. ; Lewis, Beth A. ; Whiteley, Jessica A. ; Albrecht, Anna ; Parisi, Alfred ; Bock, Beth ; Pinto, Bernardine ; Sciamanna, Christopher ; Jakicic, John ; Papandonatos, George D. / Telephone Versus Print Delivery of an Individualized Motivationally Tailored Physical Activity Intervention : Project STRIDE. In: Health Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 401-409.
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Marcus, BH, Napolitano, MA, King, AC, Lewis, BA, Whiteley, JA, Albrecht, A, Parisi, A, Bock, B, Pinto, B, Sciamanna, C, Jakicic, J & Papandonatos, GD 2007, 'Telephone Versus Print Delivery of an Individualized Motivationally Tailored Physical Activity Intervention: Project STRIDE', Health Psychology, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 401-409. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.26.4.401

Telephone Versus Print Delivery of an Individualized Motivationally Tailored Physical Activity Intervention : Project STRIDE. / Marcus, Bess H.; Napolitano, Melissa A.; King, Abby C.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Albrecht, Anna; Parisi, Alfred; Bock, Beth; Pinto, Bernardine; Sciamanna, Christopher; Jakicic, John; Papandonatos, George D.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.07.2007, p. 401-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Napolitano, Melissa A.

AU - King, Abby C.

AU - Lewis, Beth A.

AU - Whiteley, Jessica A.

AU - Albrecht, Anna

AU - Parisi, Alfred

AU - Bock, Beth

AU - Pinto, Bernardine

AU - Sciamanna, Christopher

AU - Jakicic, John

AU - Papandonatos, George D.

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Y1 - 2007/7/1

N2 - Objective: Given that only 25% of Americans meet physical activity recommendations, there is a need to develop and disseminate effective, evidence-based interventions to promote physical activity. The authors tested 2 delivery channels, telephone and print, to determine whether one was more effective in promoting physical activity. Design: The authors randomly assigned 239 healthy, sedentary adults to (a) telephone-based individualized feedback, (b) print-based individualized feedback, or (c) contact control. Both intervention arms were guided by a motivationally tailored, theoretically driven computer expert system. Main outcome measures: Physical activity as measured by the 7-day Physical Activity Recall interview. Results: At 6 months, both telephone and print arms significantly increased in minutes of moderate intensity physical activity compared with control, with no differences between the intervention arms. At 12 months, print participants reported a significantly greater number of moderate intensity minutes than both telephone and control participants, who did not differ. Conclusion: Results suggest that both telephone and print enhance the adoption of physical activity among sedentary adults; however, print interventions may be particularly effective in maintaining physical activity in the longer term.

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