Television news plugola and the last episode of Seinfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article analyzes U.S. television news coverage of the last episode of the NBC program, Seinfeld, focusing specifically on the concept of "plugola," defined as self-interested news stories that promote entertainment events. Using the Lexis/Nexis database, stories devoted to Seinfeld that aired on the Big 3 television broadcast news networks, owned and operated stations in New York City, affiliate stations in a midsize market, and the cable networks CNBC and CNN were examined. The analysis revealed that news organizations with connections to Seinfeld covered the program's last episode more extensively than those without such connections. The article also discusses implications for the role of corporate media in modern democracy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-401
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Communication
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2002

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Television
television
news
Cables
television broadcast
CNN
entertainment
coverage
democracy
Television News
event
market
Lexis
Data Base
Entertainment
News Stories
News
Democracy
News Broadcasts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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Television news plugola and the last episode of Seinfeld. / McAllister, Matthew Paul.

In: Journal of Communication, Vol. 52, No. 2, 01.06.2002, p. 383-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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