Testing gravity in large extra dimensions using Bose-Einstein condensates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent conjectures that there are mesoscopically "large" extra dimensions, through which gravity propagates have interesting implications for much of physics. The scenario implies gross departures from Newton's law of gravity at small length scales. Testing departures from Coulomb's law on sub-millimetre scales is hard. It is now possible to routinely create Bose-Einstein condensates with de Brogue wavelengths of order a μm and total size of order 10 μm. BEC condensates move coherently under gravitational acceleration, and I propose that the transverse fringe shift due to the acceleration of a pair of interfering BECs passing a dense linear mass may be measurable, and provide direct evidence for anomalous gravitational acceleration. Ideally such experiments are best carried out in free fall to maximise the time spent by a BEC in the non-Newtonian regime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1541-1544
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Modern Physics D
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Bose-Einstein Condensate
Extra Dimensions
condensate
Bose-Einstein condensates
Gravity
gravity
gravitation
Testing
free fall
Condensate
Gross
Length Scale
newton
Anomalous
condensates
Transverse
physics
Maximise
Physics
Wavelength

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mathematical Physics
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Recent conjectures that there are mesoscopically {"}large{"} extra dimensions, through which gravity propagates have interesting implications for much of physics. The scenario implies gross departures from Newton's law of gravity at small length scales. Testing departures from Coulomb's law on sub-millimetre scales is hard. It is now possible to routinely create Bose-Einstein condensates with de Brogue wavelengths of order a μm and total size of order 10 μm. BEC condensates move coherently under gravitational acceleration, and I propose that the transverse fringe shift due to the acceleration of a pair of interfering BECs passing a dense linear mass may be measurable, and provide direct evidence for anomalous gravitational acceleration. Ideally such experiments are best carried out in free fall to maximise the time spent by a BEC in the non-Newtonian regime.",
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Testing gravity in large extra dimensions using Bose-Einstein condensates. / Sigurdsson, Steinn.

In: International Journal of Modern Physics D, Vol. 11, No. 10, 01.12.2002, p. 1541-1544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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