Testing the decline-of-community thesis: neighborhood organizations in Seattle, 1929 and 1979.

Barrett Alan Lee, Ralph Salvador Oropesa, B. J. Metch, A. M. Guest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two sets of hypotheses about the organizations - the first dealing with changes in resident participation and the second with changes in functional orientation - are derived from the natural- and limited-community models. The data indicate a clear trend toward a more exclusively political emphasis among Seattle neighborhoods but cast doubt on the simple 'gemeinschaft' characterization of these areas at an earlier point in time. Concludes that, if the decline-of-community thesis is to give an accurate description of the transformation in urban neighborhood life during the past half-century, the natural-community model should be revised. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1188
Number of pages28
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume89
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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community
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participation
trend
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Lee, Barrett Alan ; Oropesa, Ralph Salvador ; Metch, B. J. ; Guest, A. M. / Testing the decline-of-community thesis : neighborhood organizations in Seattle, 1929 and 1979. In: American Journal of Sociology. 1984 ; Vol. 89, No. 5. pp. 1161-1188.
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Testing the decline-of-community thesis : neighborhood organizations in Seattle, 1929 and 1979. / Lee, Barrett Alan; Oropesa, Ralph Salvador; Metch, B. J.; Guest, A. M.

In: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 89, No. 5, 01.01.1984, p. 1161-1188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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