Text-Message Dependency, Executive Function, and Impulsivity in College Students: A Cluster Analysis

Yusuke Hayashi, Yukiko Washio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined whether text-message users would differ in levels of executive function, a trait of impulsivity, and impulsive decision making. A sample of 167 college students (57 percent of whom were female and the mean age was 19.9 years with the standard deviation of 4.1) participated. Using a hierarchical cluster analysis with levels of text-message dependency, the participants were grouped into excessive and dependent users (dependent users), excessive but nondependent users (excessive users), or nonexcessive and nondependent users (normal users). The groups were then compared on the extent to which they differed in levels of executive function, impulsivity, and impulsive decision making. The results showed that, relative to excessive users, dependent users were lower on levels of executive function and higher on levels of the trait of impulsivity. The moderating effects of gender on these differences were also examined, but gender did not significantly moderate the differences. This study demonstrated that excessive text-message users are not necessarily dependent text-message users and executive function and impulsivity may play an important role in differentiating the two types of users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)794-799
Number of pages6
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

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