That's so OCD: The effects of disease trivialization via social media on user perceptions and impression formation

Rachelle L. Pavelko, Jessica Myrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Informal discussions of mental illness take place every day in social media. In the case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in particular, widespread use of the hashtag "#OCD" indicates that social media users often trivialize the disease. The present study used a 3 × 2 × 2 between-subjects fully factorial online experiment (N = 574, recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform) to test the impact of trivialized framing of this disease on perceptions of social media users who employ such language, as well as on perceptions of people with OCD as a group. Additionally, this study tested the effects of the gender of the Twitter avatar and self-identification in the avatar biography as an individual with OCD on these perceptions. Three-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) assessed the impact of the manipulations (i.e., content frame, gender of the avatar, self-identification with OCD). Results indicate that language use, gender, and self-identification influence impression formation in a social media environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Social Media
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Language
Social Environment
Experiments
Impression Formation
Obsessive-compulsive Disorder
Avatar
Self-identification

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{7fc752b7eb004bfca108959607796074,
title = "That's so OCD: The effects of disease trivialization via social media on user perceptions and impression formation",
abstract = "Informal discussions of mental illness take place every day in social media. In the case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in particular, widespread use of the hashtag {"}#OCD{"} indicates that social media users often trivialize the disease. The present study used a 3 × 2 × 2 between-subjects fully factorial online experiment (N = 574, recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform) to test the impact of trivialized framing of this disease on perceptions of social media users who employ such language, as well as on perceptions of people with OCD as a group. Additionally, this study tested the effects of the gender of the Twitter avatar and self-identification in the avatar biography as an individual with OCD on these perceptions. Three-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) assessed the impact of the manipulations (i.e., content frame, gender of the avatar, self-identification with OCD). Results indicate that language use, gender, and self-identification influence impression formation in a social media environment.",
author = "Pavelko, {Rachelle L.} and Jessica Myrick",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.061",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "251--258",
journal = "Computers in Human Behavior",
issn = "0747-5632",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

That's so OCD : The effects of disease trivialization via social media on user perceptions and impression formation. / Pavelko, Rachelle L.; Myrick, Jessica.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 49, 01.01.2015, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - That's so OCD

T2 - The effects of disease trivialization via social media on user perceptions and impression formation

AU - Pavelko, Rachelle L.

AU - Myrick, Jessica

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Informal discussions of mental illness take place every day in social media. In the case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in particular, widespread use of the hashtag "#OCD" indicates that social media users often trivialize the disease. The present study used a 3 × 2 × 2 between-subjects fully factorial online experiment (N = 574, recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform) to test the impact of trivialized framing of this disease on perceptions of social media users who employ such language, as well as on perceptions of people with OCD as a group. Additionally, this study tested the effects of the gender of the Twitter avatar and self-identification in the avatar biography as an individual with OCD on these perceptions. Three-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) assessed the impact of the manipulations (i.e., content frame, gender of the avatar, self-identification with OCD). Results indicate that language use, gender, and self-identification influence impression formation in a social media environment.

AB - Informal discussions of mental illness take place every day in social media. In the case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in particular, widespread use of the hashtag "#OCD" indicates that social media users often trivialize the disease. The present study used a 3 × 2 × 2 between-subjects fully factorial online experiment (N = 574, recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform) to test the impact of trivialized framing of this disease on perceptions of social media users who employ such language, as well as on perceptions of people with OCD as a group. Additionally, this study tested the effects of the gender of the Twitter avatar and self-identification in the avatar biography as an individual with OCD on these perceptions. Three-way analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) assessed the impact of the manipulations (i.e., content frame, gender of the avatar, self-identification with OCD). Results indicate that language use, gender, and self-identification influence impression formation in a social media environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925296702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925296702&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.061

DO - 10.1016/j.chb.2015.02.061

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84925296702

VL - 49

SP - 251

EP - 258

JO - Computers in Human Behavior

JF - Computers in Human Behavior

SN - 0747-5632

ER -