The 12 cc penn state pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device: Flow field observations at a reduced beat rate with application to weaning

Breigh N. Roszelle, Benjamin T. Cooper, Tobias C. Long, Steven Deutsch, Keefe B. Manning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have become a viable option for adult patients with end-stage heart failure during the bridge-to-transplant period and have recently shown promise in aiding in myocardial recovery. Because the number of available organs is insufficient, mechanical circulatory support systems such as VADs are also being developed for use in pediatric patients. During myocardial recovery, the system must be weaned from the patient to prepare for explant; for pulsatile devices, this often includes a reduction in flow rate, which can change the fluid dynamics of the device. These changes in flow need to be monitored because strong diastolic rotational flow, no areas of blood stasis, low blood residence time, and wall shear rates above 500 s -1, can help prevent thrombus deposition. Particle image velocimetry was used to observe the planar flow patterns and wall shear rates of the 12 cc Penn State Pneumatic Pediatric VAD (PVAD) at a normal operating condition and a reduced beat rate. At the reduced beat rate, the PVAD showed an earlier loss of rotational pattern, increased blood residence time, and an overall reduction in wall shear rate at the outer walls. Because this reduction in flow rate could lead to a possible increase in thrombus deposition, it may be necessary to look into other options for weaning a patient from the PVAD. ASAIO Journal 2008; 54:325-331.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Heart-Assist Devices
Weaning
Flow fields
Shear deformation
Blood
Thrombosis
Flow rate
Rotational flow
Recovery
Equipment and Supplies
Transplants
Rheology
Hydrodynamics
Cardiovascular System
Fluid dynamics
Velocity measurement
Pneumatics
Flow patterns
Heart Failure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Roszelle, Breigh N. ; Cooper, Benjamin T. ; Long, Tobias C. ; Deutsch, Steven ; Manning, Keefe B. / The 12 cc penn state pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device : Flow field observations at a reduced beat rate with application to weaning. In: ASAIO Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 325-331.
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The 12 cc penn state pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device : Flow field observations at a reduced beat rate with application to weaning. / Roszelle, Breigh N.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Long, Tobias C.; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

In: ASAIO Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.05.2008, p. 325-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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