The acceptance and growth of MSN/MBA Programs

Ann Minnick, Carol S. Weisman, Linda Curgian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The value of graduate programs that unable nurses lo earn masters decrees in nursing (MSN) and business administration (MBA) through coordinated courses of study has been debated repeatedly. This article describes the subsequent development of the dual degree option (MSN/MBA) within US nursing graduate programs, explores the opportunities and problems reported by programs offering this form of education, and considers the future development of these types of programs. The article is based on a survey of 167 schools of nursing offering graduate programs. The authors describe the challenges to these programs’ continued expansion and the role that healthcare reform may have in shaping the education market.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-68
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nursing Administration
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Nursing
Growth
Education
School Nursing
Health Care Reform
Nurses
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management

Cite this

Minnick, Ann ; Weisman, Carol S. ; Curgian, Linda. / The acceptance and growth of MSN/MBA Programs. In: Journal of Nursing Administration. 1994 ; Vol. 24, No. 11. pp. 63-68.
@article{be5fba3cc4a24df28f6341e0aa1c01a0,
title = "The acceptance and growth of MSN/MBA Programs",
abstract = "The value of graduate programs that unable nurses lo earn masters decrees in nursing (MSN) and business administration (MBA) through coordinated courses of study has been debated repeatedly. This article describes the subsequent development of the dual degree option (MSN/MBA) within US nursing graduate programs, explores the opportunities and problems reported by programs offering this form of education, and considers the future development of these types of programs. The article is based on a survey of 167 schools of nursing offering graduate programs. The authors describe the challenges to these programs’ continued expansion and the role that healthcare reform may have in shaping the education market.",
author = "Ann Minnick and Weisman, {Carol S.} and Linda Curgian",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00005110-199411000-00013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "63--68",
journal = "Journal of Nursing Administration",
issn = "0002-0443",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

The acceptance and growth of MSN/MBA Programs. / Minnick, Ann; Weisman, Carol S.; Curgian, Linda.

In: Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 24, No. 11, 01.01.1994, p. 63-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The acceptance and growth of MSN/MBA Programs

AU - Minnick, Ann

AU - Weisman, Carol S.

AU - Curgian, Linda

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - The value of graduate programs that unable nurses lo earn masters decrees in nursing (MSN) and business administration (MBA) through coordinated courses of study has been debated repeatedly. This article describes the subsequent development of the dual degree option (MSN/MBA) within US nursing graduate programs, explores the opportunities and problems reported by programs offering this form of education, and considers the future development of these types of programs. The article is based on a survey of 167 schools of nursing offering graduate programs. The authors describe the challenges to these programs’ continued expansion and the role that healthcare reform may have in shaping the education market.

AB - The value of graduate programs that unable nurses lo earn masters decrees in nursing (MSN) and business administration (MBA) through coordinated courses of study has been debated repeatedly. This article describes the subsequent development of the dual degree option (MSN/MBA) within US nursing graduate programs, explores the opportunities and problems reported by programs offering this form of education, and considers the future development of these types of programs. The article is based on a survey of 167 schools of nursing offering graduate programs. The authors describe the challenges to these programs’ continued expansion and the role that healthcare reform may have in shaping the education market.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027986959&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027986959&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00005110-199411000-00013

DO - 10.1097/00005110-199411000-00013

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 63

EP - 68

JO - Journal of Nursing Administration

JF - Journal of Nursing Administration

SN - 0002-0443

IS - 11

ER -