The acquisition of lexical and grammatical aspect in Chinese

Ping Li, Melissa Bowerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reports three experiments on how children learning Mandarin Chinese comprehend and use aspect markers. These experiments examine the role of lexical aspect in children's acquisition of grammatical aspect. Results provide converging evidence for children's early sensitivity to (1) the association between atelic verbs and the imperfective aspect markers zai, -zhe, and -ne, and (2) the association between telic verbs and the perfective aspect marker -le. Children did not show a sensitivity in their use or understanding of aspect markers to the difference between stative and activity verbs or between semelfactive and activity verbs. These results are consistent with Slobin's (1985) basic child grammar hypothesis that the contrast between process and result is important in children's early acquisition of temporal morphology. In contrast, they are inconsistent with Bickerton's (1981, 1984) language bioprogram hypothesis that the distinctions between state and process and between punctual and nonpunctual are preprogrammed into language learners. We suggest new ways of looking at the results in the light of recent probabilistic hypotheses that emphasize the role of input, prototypes and connectionist representations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-350
Number of pages40
JournalFirst Language
Volume18
Issue number54
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998

Fingerprint

experiment
language
Grammatical Aspect
Lexical Aspect
grammar
Verbs
learning
evidence
Experiment
Language
Grammar
Mandarin Chinese
Telic
Connectionist
Atelic
Perfective Aspect
Stative
Prototype
Imperfective Aspect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Li, Ping ; Bowerman, Melissa. / The acquisition of lexical and grammatical aspect in Chinese. In: First Language. 1998 ; Vol. 18, No. 54. pp. 311-350.
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The acquisition of lexical and grammatical aspect in Chinese. / Li, Ping; Bowerman, Melissa.

In: First Language, Vol. 18, No. 54, 01.12.1998, p. 311-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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