The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724

E. Berger, P. A. Price, S. B. Cenko, A. Gal-Yam, A. M. Soderberg, M. Kasliwal, D. C. Leonard, P. B. Cameron, D. A. Frail, S. R. Kulkarni, D. C. Murphy, W. Krzeminski, T. Piran, B. L. Lee, K. C. Roth, D. S. Moon, Derek Brindley Fox, F. A. Harrison, S. E. Persson, B. P. Schmidt & 4 others B. E. Penprase, J. Rich, B. A. Peterson, L. L. Cowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Despite a rich phenomenology, γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided 1 into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness - the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing 2 their origin to star-forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating 3 an energy release of about 10 51 erg. While theoretical arguments 4 suggest that short GRBs are produced in the coalescence of binary compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent 5-8 localizations. Here we report the discovery of the first radio afterglow from the short burst GRB 050724, which unambiguously associates it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift 9 z = 0.257. We show that the burst is powered by the same relativistic fireball mechanism as long GRBs, with the ejecta possibly collimated in jets, but that the total energy release is 10-1,000 times smaller. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy demonstrates that short GRBs arise from an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions 5,6 and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)988-990
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume438
Issue number7070
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2005

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Galaxies
Neutrons
Hardness
Radio
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

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Berger, E., Price, P. A., Cenko, S. B., Gal-Yam, A., Soderberg, A. M., Kasliwal, M., ... Cowie, L. L. (2005). The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724. Nature, 438(7070), 988-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04238
Berger, E. ; Price, P. A. ; Cenko, S. B. ; Gal-Yam, A. ; Soderberg, A. M. ; Kasliwal, M. ; Leonard, D. C. ; Cameron, P. B. ; Frail, D. A. ; Kulkarni, S. R. ; Murphy, D. C. ; Krzeminski, W. ; Piran, T. ; Lee, B. L. ; Roth, K. C. ; Moon, D. S. ; Fox, Derek Brindley ; Harrison, F. A. ; Persson, S. E. ; Schmidt, B. P. ; Penprase, B. E. ; Rich, J. ; Peterson, B. A. ; Cowie, L. L. / The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724. In: Nature. 2005 ; Vol. 438, No. 7070. pp. 988-990.
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abstract = "Despite a rich phenomenology, γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided 1 into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness - the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing 2 their origin to star-forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating 3 an energy release of about 10 51 erg. While theoretical arguments 4 suggest that short GRBs are produced in the coalescence of binary compact objects (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent 5-8 localizations. Here we report the discovery of the first radio afterglow from the short burst GRB 050724, which unambiguously associates it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift 9 z = 0.257. We show that the burst is powered by the same relativistic fireball mechanism as long GRBs, with the ejecta possibly collimated in jets, but that the total energy release is 10-1,000 times smaller. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy demonstrates that short GRBs arise from an old (>1 Gyr) stellar population, strengthening earlier suggestions 5,6 and providing support for coalescing compact object binaries as the progenitors.",
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Berger, E, Price, PA, Cenko, SB, Gal-Yam, A, Soderberg, AM, Kasliwal, M, Leonard, DC, Cameron, PB, Frail, DA, Kulkarni, SR, Murphy, DC, Krzeminski, W, Piran, T, Lee, BL, Roth, KC, Moon, DS, Fox, DB, Harrison, FA, Persson, SE, Schmidt, BP, Penprase, BE, Rich, J, Peterson, BA & Cowie, LL 2005, 'The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724', Nature, vol. 438, no. 7070, pp. 988-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04238

The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724. / Berger, E.; Price, P. A.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Kasliwal, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Cameron, P. B.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Murphy, D. C.; Krzeminski, W.; Piran, T.; Lee, B. L.; Roth, K. C.; Moon, D. S.; Fox, Derek Brindley; Harrison, F. A.; Persson, S. E.; Schmidt, B. P.; Penprase, B. E.; Rich, J.; Peterson, B. A.; Cowie, L. L.

In: Nature, Vol. 438, No. 7070, 15.12.2005, p. 988-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Berger, E.

AU - Price, P. A.

AU - Cenko, S. B.

AU - Gal-Yam, A.

AU - Soderberg, A. M.

AU - Kasliwal, M.

AU - Leonard, D. C.

AU - Cameron, P. B.

AU - Frail, D. A.

AU - Kulkarni, S. R.

AU - Murphy, D. C.

AU - Krzeminski, W.

AU - Piran, T.

AU - Lee, B. L.

AU - Roth, K. C.

AU - Moon, D. S.

AU - Fox, Derek Brindley

AU - Harrison, F. A.

AU - Persson, S. E.

AU - Schmidt, B. P.

AU - Penprase, B. E.

AU - Rich, J.

AU - Peterson, B. A.

AU - Cowie, L. L.

PY - 2005/12/15

Y1 - 2005/12/15

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Berger E, Price PA, Cenko SB, Gal-Yam A, Soderberg AM, Kasliwal M et al. The afterglow and elliptical host galaxy of the short γ-ray burst GRB 050724. Nature. 2005 Dec 15;438(7070):988-990. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04238