The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts

Derek Brindley Fox, D. A. Frail, P. A. Price, S. R. Kulkarni, E. Berger, T. Piran, A. M. Soderberg, S. B. Cenko, P. B. Cameron, A. Gal-Yam, M. M. Kasliwal, D. S. Moon, F. A. Harrison, E. Nakar, B. P. Schmidt, B. Penprase, R. A. Chevalier, P. Kumar, K. Roth, D. Watson & 16 others B. L. Lee, S. Shectman, M. M. Phillips, M. Roth, P. J. McCarthy, M. Rauch, L. Cowie, B. A. Peterson, J. Rich, N. Kawai, K. Aoki, G. Kosugi, T. Totani, H. S. Park, A. MacFadyen, K. C. Hurley

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Abstract

The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the γ-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class of bursts, which are suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron-star or black-hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst, GRB 050709, whose accurate position allows us to associate it unambiguously with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-850
Number of pages6
JournalNature
Volume437
Issue number7060
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2005

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Galaxies
X-Rays
Neutrons
Radio
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

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Fox, D. B., Frail, D. A., Price, P. A., Kulkarni, S. R., Berger, E., Piran, T., ... Hurley, K. C. (2005). The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts. Nature, 437(7060), 845-850. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04189
Fox, Derek Brindley ; Frail, D. A. ; Price, P. A. ; Kulkarni, S. R. ; Berger, E. ; Piran, T. ; Soderberg, A. M. ; Cenko, S. B. ; Cameron, P. B. ; Gal-Yam, A. ; Kasliwal, M. M. ; Moon, D. S. ; Harrison, F. A. ; Nakar, E. ; Schmidt, B. P. ; Penprase, B. ; Chevalier, R. A. ; Kumar, P. ; Roth, K. ; Watson, D. ; Lee, B. L. ; Shectman, S. ; Phillips, M. M. ; Roth, M. ; McCarthy, P. J. ; Rauch, M. ; Cowie, L. ; Peterson, B. A. ; Rich, J. ; Kawai, N. ; Aoki, K. ; Kosugi, G. ; Totani, T. ; Park, H. S. ; MacFadyen, A. ; Hurley, K. C. / The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts. In: Nature. 2005 ; Vol. 437, No. 7060. pp. 845-850.
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abstract = "The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the γ-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class of bursts, which are suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron-star or black-hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst, GRB 050709, whose accurate position allows us to associate it unambiguously with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.",
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Fox, DB, Frail, DA, Price, PA, Kulkarni, SR, Berger, E, Piran, T, Soderberg, AM, Cenko, SB, Cameron, PB, Gal-Yam, A, Kasliwal, MM, Moon, DS, Harrison, FA, Nakar, E, Schmidt, BP, Penprase, B, Chevalier, RA, Kumar, P, Roth, K, Watson, D, Lee, BL, Shectman, S, Phillips, MM, Roth, M, McCarthy, PJ, Rauch, M, Cowie, L, Peterson, BA, Rich, J, Kawai, N, Aoki, K, Kosugi, G, Totani, T, Park, HS, MacFadyen, A & Hurley, KC 2005, 'The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts', Nature, vol. 437, no. 7060, pp. 845-850. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04189

The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts. / Fox, Derek Brindley; Frail, D. A.; Price, P. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Berger, E.; Piran, T.; Soderberg, A. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Cameron, P. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Moon, D. S.; Harrison, F. A.; Nakar, E.; Schmidt, B. P.; Penprase, B.; Chevalier, R. A.; Kumar, P.; Roth, K.; Watson, D.; Lee, B. L.; Shectman, S.; Phillips, M. M.; Roth, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; Rauch, M.; Cowie, L.; Peterson, B. A.; Rich, J.; Kawai, N.; Aoki, K.; Kosugi, G.; Totani, T.; Park, H. S.; MacFadyen, A.; Hurley, K. C.

In: Nature, Vol. 437, No. 7060, 06.10.2005, p. 845-850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts

AU - Fox, Derek Brindley

AU - Frail, D. A.

AU - Price, P. A.

AU - Kulkarni, S. R.

AU - Berger, E.

AU - Piran, T.

AU - Soderberg, A. M.

AU - Cenko, S. B.

AU - Cameron, P. B.

AU - Gal-Yam, A.

AU - Kasliwal, M. M.

AU - Moon, D. S.

AU - Harrison, F. A.

AU - Nakar, E.

AU - Schmidt, B. P.

AU - Penprase, B.

AU - Chevalier, R. A.

AU - Kumar, P.

AU - Roth, K.

AU - Watson, D.

AU - Lee, B. L.

AU - Shectman, S.

AU - Phillips, M. M.

AU - Roth, M.

AU - McCarthy, P. J.

AU - Rauch, M.

AU - Cowie, L.

AU - Peterson, B. A.

AU - Rich, J.

AU - Kawai, N.

AU - Aoki, K.

AU - Kosugi, G.

AU - Totani, T.

AU - Park, H. S.

AU - MacFadyen, A.

AU - Hurley, K. C.

PY - 2005/10/6

Y1 - 2005/10/6

N2 - The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the γ-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class of bursts, which are suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron-star or black-hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst, GRB 050709, whose accurate position allows us to associate it unambiguously with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.

AB - The final chapter in the long-standing mystery of the γ-ray bursts (GRBs) centres on the origin of the short-hard class of bursts, which are suspected on theoretical grounds to result from the coalescence of neutron-star or black-hole binary systems. Numerous searches for the afterglows of short-hard bursts have been made, galvanized by the revolution in our understanding of long-duration GRBs that followed the discovery in 1997 of their broadband (X-ray, optical and radio) afterglow emission. Here we present the discovery of the X-ray afterglow of a short-hard burst, GRB 050709, whose accurate position allows us to associate it unambiguously with a star-forming galaxy at redshift z = 0.160, and whose optical lightcurve definitively excludes a supernova association. Together with results from three other recent short-hard bursts, this suggests that short-hard bursts release much less energy than the long-duration GRBs. Models requiring young stellar populations, such as magnetars and collapsars, are ruled out, while coalescing degenerate binaries remain the most promising progenitor candidates.

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Fox DB, Frail DA, Price PA, Kulkarni SR, Berger E, Piran T et al. The afterglow of GRB 050709 and the nature of the short-hard γ-ray bursts. Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):845-850. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04189