The Allergies, Immunotherapy, and Rhinoconjunctivitis (AIRS) survey

Patients' experience with allergen immunotherapy

David P. Skoner, Michael S. Blaiss, Mark S. Dykewicz, Nancy Smith, Bryan Leatherman, Leonard Bielory, Nicole Walstein, Timothy Craig, Felicia Allen-Ramey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is used for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis as a subcutaneous injection (subcutaneous immunotherapy [SCIT]). Extracts used for SCIT are also used off-label to formulate a liquid delivered as sublingual drops (sublingual immunotherapy [SLIT]). This study was designed to survey patients' experiences and beliefs regarding SCIT and SLIT. People who had ever been diagnosed with nasal and/or ocular allergies were identified in a 2012 telephone survey of U.S. households. Respondents were asked questions about their or their child's use of SCIT and SLIT and their beliefs about AIT. Of 2765 respondents, 46.5% had ever heard of AIT and 22.7% had ever initiated it: 20.9% with SCIT and 1.8% with SLIT (p < 0.0001). The most frequently cited reason for beginning AIT was that symptoms were unresolved with other medications (SCIT, 32.1%; SLIT, 14.0%). Some or full symptom relief was reported by 74.9% of respondents treated with SCIT and 66.0% of those treated with SLIT (p = 0.17 for SCIT versus SLIT). Approximately one-third of respondents who had ever heard of or had been treated with AIT said "don't know" when asked if immunotherapy controls allergy symptoms for years (33.6%), is a very safe treatment (29.3%), or can cure allergy symptoms (27.5%). Effective relief of allergy symptoms was cited most often as the primary benefit of SCIT (37.8%) and convenience was the primary benefit of SLIT (14%). Only one-fifth of respondents had ever been treated with AIT, largely with SCIT. More than one-half of respondents had never heard of AIT and respondents' beliefs indicated a need for educational efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-226
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy and Asthma Proceedings
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Immunologic Desensitization
Sublingual Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy
Hypersensitivity
Surveys and Questionnaires
Subcutaneous Injections
Nose
Telephone

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Skoner, D. P., Blaiss, M. S., Dykewicz, M. S., Smith, N., Leatherman, B., Bielory, L., ... Allen-Ramey, F. (2014). The Allergies, Immunotherapy, and Rhinoconjunctivitis (AIRS) survey: Patients' experience with allergen immunotherapy. Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, 35(3), 219-226. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2014.35.3752
Skoner, David P. ; Blaiss, Michael S. ; Dykewicz, Mark S. ; Smith, Nancy ; Leatherman, Bryan ; Bielory, Leonard ; Walstein, Nicole ; Craig, Timothy ; Allen-Ramey, Felicia. / The Allergies, Immunotherapy, and Rhinoconjunctivitis (AIRS) survey : Patients' experience with allergen immunotherapy. In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 219-226.
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Skoner, DP, Blaiss, MS, Dykewicz, MS, Smith, N, Leatherman, B, Bielory, L, Walstein, N, Craig, T & Allen-Ramey, F 2014, 'The Allergies, Immunotherapy, and Rhinoconjunctivitis (AIRS) survey: Patients' experience with allergen immunotherapy', Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 219-226. https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2014.35.3752

The Allergies, Immunotherapy, and Rhinoconjunctivitis (AIRS) survey : Patients' experience with allergen immunotherapy. / Skoner, David P.; Blaiss, Michael S.; Dykewicz, Mark S.; Smith, Nancy; Leatherman, Bryan; Bielory, Leonard; Walstein, Nicole; Craig, Timothy; Allen-Ramey, Felicia.

In: Allergy and Asthma Proceedings, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 219-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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