The Asian Attraction: Pivotal Priorities and Nuclear Dangers in U.S. Security Policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The United States' military-strategic pivot toward Asia is motived by concerns about a rising China, about the increased significance of Asia on the world economic and political stages, and about the growing risks of nuclear proliferation and nuclear first use in that region. Nuclear Asia already numbers five acknowledged or de facto nuclear weapons states among its members: Russia, China, North Korea, India, and Pakistan. Failure to reverse North Korea's nuclear weapons status or political distrust among other powers may increase the number of Asian nuclear weapons states (including states with prospective nuclear-missile reach into Asia) to eight, creating an Asian-Middle Eastern nuclear arms race that defies containment. On the other hand, an alternative presents itself, in the form of a multilateral nuclear arms reduction agreement that would create three tiers of accepted nuclear weapons states and bar the door to new admits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-188
Number of pages12
JournalComparative Strategy
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

nuclear weapon
security policy
North Korea
arms race
China
proliferation
Pakistan
Russia
Military
India
economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

@article{64f8250b8c2f42fab9515da23e439b9a,
title = "The Asian Attraction: Pivotal Priorities and Nuclear Dangers in U.S. Security Policy",
abstract = "The United States' military-strategic pivot toward Asia is motived by concerns about a rising China, about the increased significance of Asia on the world economic and political stages, and about the growing risks of nuclear proliferation and nuclear first use in that region. Nuclear Asia already numbers five acknowledged or de facto nuclear weapons states among its members: Russia, China, North Korea, India, and Pakistan. Failure to reverse North Korea's nuclear weapons status or political distrust among other powers may increase the number of Asian nuclear weapons states (including states with prospective nuclear-missile reach into Asia) to eight, creating an Asian-Middle Eastern nuclear arms race that defies containment. On the other hand, an alternative presents itself, in the form of a multilateral nuclear arms reduction agreement that would create three tiers of accepted nuclear weapons states and bar the door to new admits.",
author = "Stephen Cimbala",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01495933.2014.897140",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "177--188",
journal = "Comparative Strategy",
issn = "0149-5933",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

The Asian Attraction : Pivotal Priorities and Nuclear Dangers in U.S. Security Policy. / Cimbala, Stephen.

In: Comparative Strategy, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 177-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Asian Attraction

T2 - Pivotal Priorities and Nuclear Dangers in U.S. Security Policy

AU - Cimbala, Stephen

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The United States' military-strategic pivot toward Asia is motived by concerns about a rising China, about the increased significance of Asia on the world economic and political stages, and about the growing risks of nuclear proliferation and nuclear first use in that region. Nuclear Asia already numbers five acknowledged or de facto nuclear weapons states among its members: Russia, China, North Korea, India, and Pakistan. Failure to reverse North Korea's nuclear weapons status or political distrust among other powers may increase the number of Asian nuclear weapons states (including states with prospective nuclear-missile reach into Asia) to eight, creating an Asian-Middle Eastern nuclear arms race that defies containment. On the other hand, an alternative presents itself, in the form of a multilateral nuclear arms reduction agreement that would create three tiers of accepted nuclear weapons states and bar the door to new admits.

AB - The United States' military-strategic pivot toward Asia is motived by concerns about a rising China, about the increased significance of Asia on the world economic and political stages, and about the growing risks of nuclear proliferation and nuclear first use in that region. Nuclear Asia already numbers five acknowledged or de facto nuclear weapons states among its members: Russia, China, North Korea, India, and Pakistan. Failure to reverse North Korea's nuclear weapons status or political distrust among other powers may increase the number of Asian nuclear weapons states (including states with prospective nuclear-missile reach into Asia) to eight, creating an Asian-Middle Eastern nuclear arms race that defies containment. On the other hand, an alternative presents itself, in the form of a multilateral nuclear arms reduction agreement that would create three tiers of accepted nuclear weapons states and bar the door to new admits.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84899689462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84899689462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01495933.2014.897140

DO - 10.1080/01495933.2014.897140

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84899689462

VL - 33

SP - 177

EP - 188

JO - Comparative Strategy

JF - Comparative Strategy

SN - 0149-5933

IS - 2

ER -