The assessment of motor control in sighting dominance using an illusion decrement procedure

Clare Porac, Stanley Coren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Walls (1951) proposed that perceptual asymmetries between the sighting dominant and the nonsighting dominant eyes were based upon differences in the monitoring of eye movements. The present research explored this hypothesis in the context of an illusion decrement paradigm. Since illusion decrement seems to occur only under conditions of free eye-movement inspection, it was reasoned that any motoric asymmetries would manifest themselves through differences in the rate and extent of decrement. These predictions were partially confirmed. The sighting eye manifested greater illusion decrement, but the effect remained specific to conditions where both eyes were stimulated. In addition, asymmetries in the interocular transfer of illusion decrement were found to favor the sighting dominant eye.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-346
Number of pages6
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1977

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asymmetry
Eye Movements
monitoring
paradigm
Motor Control
Illusion
Research
Asymmetry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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The assessment of motor control in sighting dominance using an illusion decrement procedure. / Porac, Clare; Coren, Stanley.

In: Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.07.1977, p. 341-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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