The Association Between Common Clinical Characteristics and Postoperative Morbidity and Overall Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma

Wenli Liu, Aiham Qdaisat, Jason Yeung, Gabriel Lopez, Jeffrey Weinberg, Shouhao Zhou, Lorenzo Cohen, Eduardo Bruera, Sai Ching J. Yeung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The impact of noncancerous factors on the morbidity and mortality of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has not been well studied. Using a large surgical cohort, we examined the association between multiple clinical characteristics and postoperative morbidities and survival in patients with GBM. Materials and Methods: The study included 404 consecutive GBM patients who underwent initial tumor resection at MD Anderson Cancer Center between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. Data about clinical characteristics, treatments, and postoperative complications were collected. The associations between clinical parameters and postoperative complications and survival were analyzed. Results: Charlson Comorbidity Index was positively related to a higher incidence of postoperative total (odds ratio [OR] = 1.20; p =.002) and neurological (OR = 1.18; p =.011) complications. Preoperative systolic blood pressure (SBp) over 140 mmHg was associated with a higher incidence of postoperative intracranial hemorrhage (OR = 4.42; p =.039) and longer hospital stay (OR = 2.48; p =.015). Greater postoperative fluctuation of SBp (OR = 1.14; p =.025) and blood glucose (mmol/L; OR = 1.48; p =.023) were related to a higher incidence of neurological complications, whereas higher postoperative blood glucose (OR = 0.64; p <.001) was related to a lower incidence. Long-term lower SBp (<124 mmHg; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.47; p =.010) and higher blood glucose (HR = 1.12; p <.001) were associated with shorter survival. Long-term serum albumin level (g/dL; HR = 0.32; p <.001) was positively associated with survival. Conclusion: Short-term SBp and blood glucose levels and fluctuations are associated with postoperative complications in GBM patients. Their long-term optimization may impact survival of these patients. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm the benefit of optimizing medical comorbidities on GBM patients' outcomes. Implications for Practice: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most feared cancer diagnoses because of its limited survival and treatment. This study revealed significant associations of noncancerous factors on the morbidity and mortality of GBM. The complexity of medical comorbidities, as well as short-term postoperative levels and fluctuations of blood pressure and blood glucose, was associated with postoperative complications, but not overall survival. However, long-term levels of these common clinical parameters were significantly associated with survival. Optimization of medical conditions may be critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality of GBM patients. Future clinical trials are needed to validate the observed associations in an independent cohort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-536
Number of pages8
JournalOncologist
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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