The association of physical activity with lung cancer incidence in a cohort of older women: The Iowa Women's Health Study

Penny Sinner, Aaron R. Folsom, Lisa Harnack, Lynn E. Eberly, Kathryn H. Schmitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We examined the potential association between physical activity and lung cancer in women. Methods: In 1986,36,929 women from Iowa, who were free of prior cancer, completed a questionnaire regarding physical activity, smoking, body mass index, and other life-style factors. Women were followed through 2002 for cancer incidence. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, women with high physical activity levels were less likely [hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.64-0.94] to develop lung cancer than women with low activity levels. This hazard ratio was 0.72 (95% CI, 0.55-0.94) in current smokers and 0.63 (95% CI, 0.43-0.92) in former smokers, but was not significant in never smokers. Conclusion: These results suggest that physical activity might reduce the risk of lung cancer in women who are current or former smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2359-2363
Number of pages5
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Women's Health
Lung Neoplasms
Exercise
Incidence
Confidence Intervals
Life Style
Neoplasms
Body Mass Index
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: We examined the potential association between physical activity and lung cancer in women. Methods: In 1986,36,929 women from Iowa, who were free of prior cancer, completed a questionnaire regarding physical activity, smoking, body mass index, and other life-style factors. Women were followed through 2002 for cancer incidence. Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, women with high physical activity levels were less likely [hazard ratio, 0.77; 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI), 0.64-0.94] to develop lung cancer than women with low activity levels. This hazard ratio was 0.72 (95{\%} CI, 0.55-0.94) in current smokers and 0.63 (95{\%} CI, 0.43-0.92) in former smokers, but was not significant in never smokers. Conclusion: These results suggest that physical activity might reduce the risk of lung cancer in women who are current or former smokers.",
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The association of physical activity with lung cancer incidence in a cohort of older women : The Iowa Women's Health Study. / Sinner, Penny; Folsom, Aaron R.; Harnack, Lisa; Eberly, Lynn E.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 15, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 2359-2363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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