The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth

J. T. Richtsmeier, G. R. Morris, J. L. Marsh, M. W. Vannier

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three-dimensional coordinates of osseous biological landmarks located on computed tomographic (CT) images provide a valid geometric model of a class of anatomical information present in a CT image. Sets of landmarks located on CT images have been used to determine the changes in form that occur during growth of the head. Finite-element scaling analysis (FESA) provides a quantitative and graphic mapping of a younger individual into its older configuration that can be expressed as the magnitude and direction of change that occurs due to growth at each biologic locus. The authors compare the use of various finite-element types (wedges, hexahedra, tetrahedra) in the modeling of the human cranial base for the analytical description of growth. FESA quantifies differences between forms at each landmark in terms of the magnitude and direction of change (in 2-D or 3-D) required to produce the target from the initial morphology. To compare forms using FESA, objects are discretized into contiguous finite elements using landmarks as vertices. Differences between forms are measured in terms of strain at landmarks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiomedical Engineering Perspectives
Subtitle of host publicationHealth Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages387-388
Number of pages2
Editionpt 1
ISBN (Print)0879425598
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
EventProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Philadelphia, PA, USA
Duration: Nov 1 1990Nov 4 1990

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology
Numberpt 1
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

OtherProceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
CityPhiladelphia, PA, USA
Period11/1/9011/4/90

Fingerprint

Finite Element Analysis
Growth
Skull Base
Head
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Richtsmeier, J. T., Morris, G. R., Marsh, J. L., & Vannier, M. W. (1990). The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth. In Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond (pt 1 ed., pp. 387-388). (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; No. pt 1). Publ by IEEE.
Richtsmeier, J. T. ; Morris, G. R. ; Marsh, J. L. ; Vannier, M. W. / The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth. Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond. pt 1. ed. Publ by IEEE, 1990. pp. 387-388 (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; pt 1).
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Richtsmeier, JT, Morris, GR, Marsh, JL & Vannier, MW 1990, The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth. in Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond. pt 1 edn, Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology, no. pt 1, Publ by IEEE, pp. 387-388, Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 11/1/90.

The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth. / Richtsmeier, J. T.; Morris, G. R.; Marsh, J. L.; Vannier, M. W.

Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond. pt 1. ed. Publ by IEEE, 1990. p. 387-388 (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; No. pt 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Richtsmeier JT, Morris GR, Marsh JL, Vannier MW. The biological implications of varying element design in finite-element scaling analyses of growth. In Biomedical Engineering Perspectives: Health Care Technologies for the 1990's and Beyond. pt 1 ed. Publ by IEEE. 1990. p. 387-388. (Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Engineering in Medicine and Biology; pt 1).