The broadband and spectrally resolved H-band Eclipse of KELT-1b and the Role of Surface Gravity in Stratospheric Inversions in Hot Jupiters

Thomas G. Beatty, Nikku Madhusudhan, Richard Pogge, Sun Mi Chung, Allyson Bierlya, B. Scott Gaudi, David W. Latham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a high-precision H-band emission spectrum of the transiting brown dwarf KELT-1b, which we spectrophotometrically observed during a single secondary eclipse using the LUCI1 multiobject spectrograph on the Large Binocular Telescope. Using a Gaussian-process regression model, we are able to clearly measure the broadband eclipse depth as ΔH = 1418 - 94 ppm. We are also able to spectrally resolve the H band into five separate wave channels and measure the eclipse spectrum of KELT-1b at R ≈ 50 with an average precision of 135 ppm. We find that the day side has an average brightness temperature of 3250 - 50 K, with significant variation as a function of wavelength. Based on our observations and previous measurements of KELT-1b's eclipse at other wavelengths, we find that KELT-1b's day side appears identical to an isolated 3200 K brown dwarf, and our modeling of the atmospheric emission shows a monotonically decreasing temperature-pressure profile. This is in contrast to hot Jupiters with similar day-side brightness temperatures near 3000 K, all of which appear to be either isothermal or possess a stratospheric temperature inversion. We hypothesize that the lack of an inversion in KELT-1b is due to its high surface gravity, which we argue could be caused by the increased efficiency of cold-trap processes within its atmosphere.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number242
JournalAstronomical Journal
Volume154
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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