The buffering effect of nonparental adults on the relationship between parent-adolescent communication and adolescent risk behavior

Carrie W. Rishel, Lesley Cottrell, Bonita Stanton, Scott Cottrell, Steven Branstetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study tests the hypothesis that nonparental adults serve as a buffer for adolescents by examining the moderating role of nonparental adults in the relationship between parent-adolescent communication and adolescent risk behavior. Results confirm the buffering hypothesis; there is a significant relationship between parent-adolescent communication and adolescent engagement in risk behavior, but this relationship is weaker for adolescents who report strong relationships with nonparental adults. These findings inform social work practice with adolescents, families, and communities by suggesting the importance of encouraging the development of relationships between youth and nonparental adults. Implications for practitioners, policymakers, and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-377
Number of pages7
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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