The centerline pressure and cavity shape of horizontal plane choked vapor jets with low condensation potential

Timothy John Eden, Timothy Francis Miller, H. R. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study of plane, underexpanded, condensing vapor jets was undertaken using flash photography and a ventilated pressure probe. This study examined horizontal jets with much lower condensation driving potentials than have been previously studied. Photographic measurements of jet expansion angles, spread angles, cavity lengths, and cavity shapes were recorded and compared with numerical predictions using a parabolic, locally homogeneous flow model that had been modified to incorporate entrainment and condensation effects. When rendered dimensionless by the nozzle width rather than diameter, the plane condensation length agreed well with previously published round jet correlations for higher condensation driving potentials. At lower condensation driving potentials, the jets began to disperse, showing behavior similar to submerged air and energetic reacting vapor jets. Numerical predictions of condensation length were in good agreement over the entire range of measurement. Numerical predictions of vapor cavity shape were in reasonable agreement at higher condensation potentials but underpredicted the width of the vapor cavity at lower potentials. Pressure measurements showed the existence of periodic expansion/compression cells associated with underexpanded noncondensing gas jets. When these measurements were compared with similar measurements of air jets into quiescent water baths, the lengths of the initial steam vapor expansion/compression cells were substantially greater than those of the air jets, and the degree of pressure recovery over the cell length was substantially less.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)999-1007
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Heat Transfer
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Fingerprint

vapor jets
Condensation
condensation
Vapors
cavities
air jets
vapors
expansion
photographic measurement
predictions
cells
pressure recovery
Air
gas jets
condensing
photography
entrainment
pressure sensors
pressure measurement
steam

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

@article{8a9a0b7e08a6425e926129c3b9002344,
title = "The centerline pressure and cavity shape of horizontal plane choked vapor jets with low condensation potential",
abstract = "A study of plane, underexpanded, condensing vapor jets was undertaken using flash photography and a ventilated pressure probe. This study examined horizontal jets with much lower condensation driving potentials than have been previously studied. Photographic measurements of jet expansion angles, spread angles, cavity lengths, and cavity shapes were recorded and compared with numerical predictions using a parabolic, locally homogeneous flow model that had been modified to incorporate entrainment and condensation effects. When rendered dimensionless by the nozzle width rather than diameter, the plane condensation length agreed well with previously published round jet correlations for higher condensation driving potentials. At lower condensation driving potentials, the jets began to disperse, showing behavior similar to submerged air and energetic reacting vapor jets. Numerical predictions of condensation length were in good agreement over the entire range of measurement. Numerical predictions of vapor cavity shape were in reasonable agreement at higher condensation potentials but underpredicted the width of the vapor cavity at lower potentials. Pressure measurements showed the existence of periodic expansion/compression cells associated with underexpanded noncondensing gas jets. When these measurements were compared with similar measurements of air jets into quiescent water baths, the lengths of the initial steam vapor expansion/compression cells were substantially greater than those of the air jets, and the degree of pressure recovery over the cell length was substantially less.",
author = "Eden, {Timothy John} and Miller, {Timothy Francis} and Jacobs, {H. R.}",
year = "1998",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1115/1.2825921",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "999--1007",
journal = "Journal of Heat Transfer",
issn = "0022-1481",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME)",
number = "4",

}

The centerline pressure and cavity shape of horizontal plane choked vapor jets with low condensation potential. / Eden, Timothy John; Miller, Timothy Francis; Jacobs, H. R.

In: Journal of Heat Transfer, Vol. 120, No. 4, 01.01.1998, p. 999-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The centerline pressure and cavity shape of horizontal plane choked vapor jets with low condensation potential

AU - Eden, Timothy John

AU - Miller, Timothy Francis

AU - Jacobs, H. R.

PY - 1998/1/1

Y1 - 1998/1/1

N2 - A study of plane, underexpanded, condensing vapor jets was undertaken using flash photography and a ventilated pressure probe. This study examined horizontal jets with much lower condensation driving potentials than have been previously studied. Photographic measurements of jet expansion angles, spread angles, cavity lengths, and cavity shapes were recorded and compared with numerical predictions using a parabolic, locally homogeneous flow model that had been modified to incorporate entrainment and condensation effects. When rendered dimensionless by the nozzle width rather than diameter, the plane condensation length agreed well with previously published round jet correlations for higher condensation driving potentials. At lower condensation driving potentials, the jets began to disperse, showing behavior similar to submerged air and energetic reacting vapor jets. Numerical predictions of condensation length were in good agreement over the entire range of measurement. Numerical predictions of vapor cavity shape were in reasonable agreement at higher condensation potentials but underpredicted the width of the vapor cavity at lower potentials. Pressure measurements showed the existence of periodic expansion/compression cells associated with underexpanded noncondensing gas jets. When these measurements were compared with similar measurements of air jets into quiescent water baths, the lengths of the initial steam vapor expansion/compression cells were substantially greater than those of the air jets, and the degree of pressure recovery over the cell length was substantially less.

AB - A study of plane, underexpanded, condensing vapor jets was undertaken using flash photography and a ventilated pressure probe. This study examined horizontal jets with much lower condensation driving potentials than have been previously studied. Photographic measurements of jet expansion angles, spread angles, cavity lengths, and cavity shapes were recorded and compared with numerical predictions using a parabolic, locally homogeneous flow model that had been modified to incorporate entrainment and condensation effects. When rendered dimensionless by the nozzle width rather than diameter, the plane condensation length agreed well with previously published round jet correlations for higher condensation driving potentials. At lower condensation driving potentials, the jets began to disperse, showing behavior similar to submerged air and energetic reacting vapor jets. Numerical predictions of condensation length were in good agreement over the entire range of measurement. Numerical predictions of vapor cavity shape were in reasonable agreement at higher condensation potentials but underpredicted the width of the vapor cavity at lower potentials. Pressure measurements showed the existence of periodic expansion/compression cells associated with underexpanded noncondensing gas jets. When these measurements were compared with similar measurements of air jets into quiescent water baths, the lengths of the initial steam vapor expansion/compression cells were substantially greater than those of the air jets, and the degree of pressure recovery over the cell length was substantially less.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032216237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032216237&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/1.2825921

DO - 10.1115/1.2825921

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0032216237

VL - 120

SP - 999

EP - 1007

JO - Journal of Heat Transfer

JF - Journal of Heat Transfer

SN - 0022-1481

IS - 4

ER -