The Children Left Behind: The Impact of Parental Deportation on Mental Health

Brian Allen, Erica M. Cisneros, Alexandra Tellez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current report describes the results of the first known study examining the impact of parental deportation on the mental health of children using psychometrically reliable and valid assessment instruments. Participants reported on the current internalizing and externalizing problems of children under their care using the Spanish language version of the Child Behavior Checklist and completed a trauma history and demographic questionnaire that asked specifically about parental deportation status. Children with a deported parent (n = 23) were significantly more likely to display externalizing and internalizing problems than children whose parents were not deported or in the process of deportation (n = 52). Associated demographic characteristics and trauma history were controlled in these analyses. The results are discussed in the context of evolving immigration policy in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)386-392
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

deportation
Mental Health
mental health
Demography
trauma
parents
Emigration and Immigration
Wounds and Injuries
Child Behavior
Checklist
Spanish language
immigration policy
Language
Parents
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Allen, Brian ; Cisneros, Erica M. ; Tellez, Alexandra. / The Children Left Behind : The Impact of Parental Deportation on Mental Health. In: Journal of Child and Family Studies. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 386-392.
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The Children Left Behind : The Impact of Parental Deportation on Mental Health. / Allen, Brian; Cisneros, Erica M.; Tellez, Alexandra.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 386-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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