The Cognitive Learning Measure: A Three-Study Examination of Validity

Brandi N. Frisby, Daniel H. Mansson, Renee Kaufmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Instructional communication scholars have long been interested in creating and testing alternative approaches to measuring cognitive learning. One of the existing measures, the Cognitive Learning Measure (Frisby & Martin, 2010), has not yet been fully validated. This series of three studies examined the factorial and concurrent validity of the scale. Results revealed that a three-factor measurement model was a better fit to the data than the original unidimensional factor model. Concurrent validity was established with respect to student motives, affective learning, student interest, classroom participation, and out-of-class communication with their instructors. The measure is discussed as a viable option for both operationalization of cognitive learning and as a complement to other learning tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-176
Number of pages14
JournalCommunication Methods and Measures
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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cognitive learning
Students
examination
Communication
communication
operationalization
learning
instructor
Testing
student
classroom
participation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

Cite this

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The Cognitive Learning Measure : A Three-Study Examination of Validity. / Frisby, Brandi N.; Mansson, Daniel H.; Kaufmann, Renee.

In: Communication Methods and Measures, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 163-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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