The collaborative pediatric critical care research network critical pertussis study: Collaborative research in pediatric critical care medicine

Jeri S. Burr, Tammara L. Jenkins, Rick Harrison, Kathleen Meert, K. J.S. Anand, John T. Berger, Jerry Zimmerman, Joseph Carcillo, J. Michael Dean, Christopher J.L. Newth, Douglas F. Willson, Ronald C. Sanders, Murray M. Pollack, Eric Harvill, Carol E. Nicholson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To provide an updated overview of critical pertussis to the pediatric critical care community and describe a study of critical pertussis recently undertaken. Setting: The six sites, seven hospitals of the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network, and 17 outside sites at academic medical centers with pediatric intensive care units. Results: Despite high coverage for childhood vaccination, pertussis causes substantial morbidity and mortality in US children, especially among infants. In pediatric intensive care units, Bordetella pertussis is a community-acquired pathogen associated with critical illness and death. The incidence of medical and developmental sequelae in critical pertussis survivors remains unknown, and the appropriate strategies for treatment and support remain unclear. The Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network Critical Pertussis Study has begun to evaluate critical pertussis in a prospective cohort. Conclusion: Research is urgently needed to provide an evidence base that might optimize management for critical pertussis, a serious, disabling, and too often fatal illness for U.S. children and those in the developing world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-392
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Whooping Cough
Critical Care
Medicine
Pediatrics
Research
Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Bordetella pertussis
Pediatric Hospitals
Critical Illness
Survivors
Vaccination
Morbidity
Mortality
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Burr, Jeri S. ; Jenkins, Tammara L. ; Harrison, Rick ; Meert, Kathleen ; Anand, K. J.S. ; Berger, John T. ; Zimmerman, Jerry ; Carcillo, Joseph ; Dean, J. Michael ; Newth, Christopher J.L. ; Willson, Douglas F. ; Sanders, Ronald C. ; Pollack, Murray M. ; Harvill, Eric ; Nicholson, Carol E. / The collaborative pediatric critical care research network critical pertussis study : Collaborative research in pediatric critical care medicine. In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 387-392.
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Burr, JS, Jenkins, TL, Harrison, R, Meert, K, Anand, KJS, Berger, JT, Zimmerman, J, Carcillo, J, Dean, JM, Newth, CJL, Willson, DF, Sanders, RC, Pollack, MM, Harvill, E & Nicholson, CE 2011, 'The collaborative pediatric critical care research network critical pertussis study: Collaborative research in pediatric critical care medicine', Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 387-392. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0b013e3181fe4058

The collaborative pediatric critical care research network critical pertussis study : Collaborative research in pediatric critical care medicine. / Burr, Jeri S.; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen; Anand, K. J.S.; Berger, John T.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Dean, J. Michael; Newth, Christopher J.L.; Willson, Douglas F.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Pollack, Murray M.; Harvill, Eric; Nicholson, Carol E.

In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 4, 07.2011, p. 387-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Meert, Kathleen

AU - Anand, K. J.S.

AU - Berger, John T.

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AU - Carcillo, Joseph

AU - Dean, J. Michael

AU - Newth, Christopher J.L.

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AU - Harvill, Eric

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